Print

Resources >> Browse Articles >> Job Search

+3

Why You Aren't Getting Hired as a Nurse

Why You Aren't Getting Hired as a Nurse

Trouble finding a job?

Hamsa Ramesha | NursingLink

Frustrated by unemployment, nurses?

Job hunting is tricky business. Getting hired as a nurse is a subtle mix of the right qualifications, enough experience, interview chemistry, and a dash of luck. Assuming you’re making all the right moves and avoiding the really obvious job seeker mistakes, there are a few points to consider that could be your ticket out of unemployment.

Get out of your job search rut and back in the hospital by fixing these mistakes you might be making:

A Day in the Life of a...

Ever wonder what it's like to be a nurse midwife? A nurse with a doctorate? Or a holistic nurse? Find out with our A Day in the Life... series!

Go to class with Assistant Professor-CT and Director of Student Services Dr. Ruby Martinez.

Spend the day with Holistic and Rehabilitation Nurse, Barbara Klein-Robuck.

Learn what Certified Hospice & Palliative Care Nurse Maria Gatto does at work.

Deliver babies with Certified Nurse Midwife Eunice (Kitty) Ernst.

Share the struggles of an accelerated BSN nursing student with Erin Downing.

1. Job Description

Read it. Do you meet every qualification listed? If you think you can get away by not having that extra few years of experience or make do without the requested higher degree, think again. Job descriptions are a baseline for hiring managers. With so many job applicants, recruiters are naturally going to pick the best of the best, and that means you’ve got to meet every single one of the job requirements, at the very least. But that doesn’t mean you should give up, either. If you find yourself not meeting a certain job requirement time after time, do something about it! Take a certificate course, or brush up on your bedside manner. Nothing shows dedication like taking action.

2. Word Play

It’s not enough to have a clean resume free of grammar and spelling errors; you’ve got to go that extra mile. No matter how amazing your resume looks, everything lies in the words. If the hiring manager has to decipher your resume jargon, don’t expect a call back. Phrase your nursing resume with the right keywords. Use powerful words that imply action and sell your experiences by highlighting specific achievements and accomplishments. The right health care keywords are your best bet to getting your resume on top of the pile.

3. Job Search Tactics

Browsing through the classifieds? Going through Human Resources? Looking at hospital websites for job leads? One reason your search for a nursing job may have hit a dead end is because your methods are outdated. Get with the 21st century and go online! The right social network can connect you directly with the job you want. Use Monster to find jobs in your field, post a resume and find your calling with their new Career Mapping tool, and LinkedIn and NursingLink to maintain your connections. Spread yourself out and try something new — you never know which method will work!

Next: Not the Right Fit >>


+3
  • Img_1618_max50

    hazwhi

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    I am glad to see I am not the only in this boat of new grad syndrome...It has been almost two months and I have lost track of the applications that i have filled out and being rejected without even a phone call or interview, just the a computer generated response...thanks but no thanks...While in other parts of the country hospitals are recruiting new grads so i think it depends on where you live.....

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    cobrien

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Schools will always tell people that nursing is the way to go, it's a money thing, but it doesn't mean that it's true. I have been in nursing since 2004 and the market wasn't good then either. I wouldn't recommend nursing as a career, there are more down sides than what people (schools) are willing to tell you.

  • Dsc00885_max50

    snafflebit

    about 3 years ago

    216 comments

    Alas, being a new grad is the pits. After reading all the comments I at least do not feel so all alone. I graduated in May, took NCLEX in June (cut off at seventy-five questions) , academic top of the class and no job as of yet. The ones who were hired quickly had hospital connections or were student nurses at the hospitals. I did not do it cause I wanted to focus on super grades. Mistake. Experience of any sort is very important. What is even harder is that I just turned 48. I think I must have lost my mind. Now that my kids are grown and I have time to work, there are no jobs.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    snowboardjunkkie

    about 3 years ago

    4 comments

    PENKINS-I'd love to work with substance abuse patients that are going through detox-is this still considered Mental Health Nurse? I've been searching a few combos of words to find something, but no luck. Any suggestions?

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    snowboardjunkkie

    about 3 years ago

    4 comments

    It is so hard! I was turned down for not meeting requirements for a flu shot clinic, and I actually have experience in doing flu shots. It is hard to stay positive when you have bills that you can't pay, have sold everything you own, have student loans coming in, and can't even land a minimum wage job in the meantime! Yikes! Hopefully something will give. I'd love to volunteer because I love doing it, and it could be experience, but I don't have the money to put gas in my car. I do have a part time job, not as a nurse and not paying much, which I am thankful for-This is a really hard time because we've all been told nursing is the way to go. Let us all try to stay positive, and hope we start getting interviews!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Penkins

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Hang in there! All of you.. it will happen I know this is easier said than done for all of the new grads, Keep pushing and take ANYTHING that is offered so you can get your feet wet and build your confidence. Everyone has to start somewhere and the main problem is just that- Employers do not want to hire someone they "train" then you move on. Also, for nurses with a smudged past try your hand @ Drug and alcohol treatment centers they might be willing to give you the chance to come back.... Just some suggestions

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Megan24

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been looking for 8 months. I did find some of this helpful and encouraging to at least know I have some improvement and that I am doing some things right. And that i'm not alone. I feel like everyone else has been getting the jobs and I'm still searching and i feel as though i am more qualified, but that is in the eye of the interviewer of the hospital. Who would have thought just a few years back they begged for nurses, and now we're the ones begging for jobs. Thanks for the tips and help!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    StephenAFarley

    about 3 years ago

    8 comments

    Unfortunately I'm an RN being forced to leave my profession, nursing, after thirty years. Why? I made some errors -mostly documentation errors - (omissions rather than lying) and got put on probation with the Board. I have been looking for just over two years - in all fields of nursing but especially my specialties - oncology, then telemetry - but to no avail. I always tell the truth about my past when I apply, but sometimes it gets overlooked and I'm offered a great position only to be called later and told the offer is rescinded because I'm on probation. I've done everything including offering to take remedial courses, but nothing will budge these hospital hiring managers. they're heartless - and as a result they lose an RN with 30 years experience. I don't understand it. Thirty years ago I'd had a problem with drugs and went into treatment, coming out of that I got the first job I applied for (1987), but have thiings changed! It was successful then. I stayed two years, was drug tested every month for a year on the job and left with a heavy heart and lots of friends who saw that change was possible. But now? I don't think so. Unemployed and hating it, but I must work, so I'll have to leave nursing.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    marina_dilbone1

    about 3 years ago

    26 comments

    I too did not get much out of this article-too simplistic and seems as if we nurses are being talked down too
    I am a critical care nurse with over 20 years of cc experience-sometimes wonder if that and my age does not count against me-I like most of us am not near able to retire and I think as long as we make an effort we nurses should be hired-only been un/underemployed for 8 weeks feeling a big PINCH in my wallet-I am still an optimist and I leave it to God-Wishing my best to all of you looking for a great opportunity in an honorable profession!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    quakerite

    about 3 years ago

    4 comments

    "Ask yourself what you’re willing to give up to get a job." Wow. What other field requires that of its professionals?

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    fitandfifty

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Have any one tried home health nursing?

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    jgpg

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    I am an unemployed RN. I have applied for over a year and I still do not have a job. It is hard to get a job as an RN even though there are so many jobs. I was away from nursing for 10 years and decided to be home with my children. I am currently taking an RN Refresher Program that is costing me a $1000.00. When I have completed this program, I am still an RN with a BSN degree and still looking for a job. It is truly discouraging and I could not be more disgusted with the system. We were intelligent enough to learn how to be an RN don't you think we are intelligent enough to learn a position for a RN career.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    okmrbill

    about 3 years ago

    4 comments

    Well that's all well-n-good....but I still need a job....I'm just amazed at the advice sometimes offered. Moreover all the sales pitches to use "our" resume service....I can't believe what employers pay to view new applicants and what they attempt to charge job seekers seems they rake it in on both sides of the fence!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    afisher9

    almost 4 years ago

    2 comments

    This article isn't informative at all. This is common sense. Do we need a refresher course? What kind of certifications are you referring to in the article. We're regestered nurse,, that means college. We have the sense to know this stuff. How about interviewing a few INhuman resource people to find out what they want. I can't believe I'm without a job and someone got paid to write this.

  • Dsc09353_max50

    metot

    about 4 years ago

    2308 comments

    informative article

NursingLink School Finder

Save time in your search for a nursing or healthcare degree program. Use NursingLink's School Finder to locate schools online and in your area.

Get Info

* In the event that we cannot find a program from one of our partner schools that matches your specific area of interest, we may show schools with similar or unrelated programs.