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6 Illegal Nursing Interview Questions

6 Illegal Nursing Interview Questions

Hamsa Ramesha | NursingLink

ILLEGAL: “Are you a U.S. citizen?”
LEGAL: “Are you authorized to work in the U.S.?”

The hospital hiring manager isn’t allowed to ask about your national origin, and that includes inquiring about your citizenship status. Touchy immigration issues aside, this question makes unnecessary assumptions based on your looks and racial stereotypes. On the flip side, employers can ask if you’re allowed to work in the U.S. By rephrasing the question, they’re avoiding directly asking if you’re a citizen, green card holder, or on a visa.

ILLEGAL: “How old are you? When did you graduate from college?”
LEGAL: “Are you over the age of 18?”

The Nursing Interview Quiz

1. It's interview time! You arrive at your interview:

30 minutes early - you want to show your dedication to the job.
10 minutes early - But you were actually parked and ready to go in 20 minutes ago.
5 minutes late - You don't want to seem too eager.

Whether you’re 18 going on 48 or 60 going on 40, employers are not allowed to discriminate against age (which is what the first question implies). However, when asked differently, the question becomes legal; the legal phrasing implies an age range, not a specific number. After all, the hospital needs to know its nurses are over 18 years of age to work legally in the U.S.

ILLEGAL: "Are you married? How many children do you have? Who do you live with?
LEGAL: “Can you relocate if necessary? Are you willing to travel as a part of this job? Can you work overtime as necessary?”

Your marital and family status is not being interviewed here — you are. Anything about your living situation, roommates, fiancés, spouses, children, etc., is off limits. While employers might simply be trying to gauge how busy you are in your personal life to see if it clashes with your nursing responsibilities, it’s illegal to make a hiring decision based on this factor. As a potential employee, if you can commit to the necessary work hours and agree to the job requirements, your other responsibilities shouldn’t matter. Women should especially be wary of being asked for their maiden name — not required for employers if it isn’t legally your name. (But you can be asked if you’ve ever worked under another name.)

Next: “How Much Do You Weigh?” >>


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