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Career Advice for New Nurses

Career Advice for New Nurses

What advice do you have for new nurses?

Marijke Durning | NursingLink

We’ve all been there: a new graduate nurse, trying to find her way now that she’s no longer a student; or a nurse who has changed specialties with no experience in that area. Did we want advice? Did we solicit advice? Chances are, yes, we did want it, but soliciting it may have been a bit harder.

Now, as a more experienced nurse, if you see someone who could use a helping hand, do you offer advice? Or do you wait until it’s asked for?

Advice can be a touchy thing, both appreciated and resented, depending on the situation. It’s a balancing act: you want to avoid making other nurses feel like they aren’t doing their job, while still offering helpful and pertinent advice based on your experiences. It’s especially hard not to share advice if you see someone struggling when you know there’s a much easier way to do something.

Just as in other professions, nursing has issues that are both unique to nursing and fairly common to new nurses. And, while most hospitals and facilities arrange for orientations and preceptors, there may be a time when a new nurse feels alone and unsure of what to do.

Whether you’re a new nurse in search of some guidance, or an experienced nurse acting as a mentor, here are some valuable pieces of advice that always hold true:

1. Everyone makes mistakes. The difference though, is between the people who make mistakes and learn from them, versus the people who deny their mistakes.

2. Don’t guess, ever. Ask, look up, and double check if you don’t know something.

3. No matter how educated you are or how much experience you have, you are never above taking a moment to speak with a patient, touch a shoulder, or share a smile.

4. Talk TO the patient, not at her.

5. Never ignore the patient in the room while giving care, no matter what his conscious state may be.

6. Any nurse who says he has never made a mistake is unaware or not being truthful.

7. Trust your gut instinct. You can double check, but there’s a reason why we have first reactions.

Next: Don’t Forget About Learning From the Ground Up >>


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    RNurse_CCRN_MBA

    almost 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Many higher-level position for nursing in today's market require a firm grasp of business operations and strategic management. There are a few accredited MBA in Healthcare Management Programs that are available through distance learning formats so that they do not interrupt your current nursing job.

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    giftideasformen

    almost 3 years ago

    102 comments

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    lennya

    about 3 years ago

    12 comments

    Your advises are most welcomed especially now that I decided that a reliable masters in health care administration will consolidate my position in a good hospital. I intend to go for it because I have no doubt it will pay off.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    jelptex

    about 3 years ago

    2 comments

    35+ years as an RN.
    BS/crap.
    Good luck.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    lionna

    over 3 years ago

    4 comments

    I thank God for those who conceptualize this site. You`re such a blessing to all the nurses who wants to be updated & learn everyday. God bless!

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