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How to Evaluate a Nursing Job Offer

How to Evaluate a Nursing Job Offer

Make sure you accept the right job offer!

Wendy J. Meyeroff / Monster Contributing Writer

Intangible Benefits

For many nurses, the intangibles are just as important as the compensation. What intangible benefit do nurses seek most of all? Respect. Ask prospective employers how they ensure a smooth relationship among doctors and nurses, among nurses at different levels, and among nurses and the facility’s administration.

Of course, ask the nurses already there about the realities of their working environment. The employer may assure you there’s a sufficient nurse-to-patient ratio, but do the nurses agree?

Find out if the organization has a mentor program in which an experienced nurse guides a newcomer through the technical details (such as the company’s paperwork, computer systems and drug regulations) of the new-hire process. Get a sense as to whether you’ll be able to turn to your mentor beyond the first day for help in navigating the organization’s political and bureaucratic minefields as well as for career-development advice.

Consider the overall environment in which you’ll be working. For instance, if you’re a mother who needs to get home to young children at a certain time every day, then an urban emergency room is probably not right for you. Instead, check out smaller community hospitals, senior care or rehab centers, where you can pretty much be assured of clocking out at a regular time.

If you’re looking to develop expertise in a specialty – either now or down the road – research the organization’s reputation in that area, and ask about opportunities for moving into it. Also, check with nursing associations geared to that specialty. They’re another great place to find mentors and get all the information you’ll need for working in that field.

The bottom line? Nursing offers numerous opportunities for finding exactly what’s right for you, wherever you are in your career. And with the current market, you’re in the driver’s seat when it comes to negotiation.

This article was originally published on Monster.com.

Next: Deal Breakers for Hiring Managers >>

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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Kathycg

    over 2 years ago

    2 comments

    I am returning to work after a 10 year absence. How do I present that on my resume?

  • Pb300005_0040_edited-1_max50

    NursePam2010

    over 3 years ago

    4 comments

    What happens to our 401K accounts if we change jobs only to find 10 yrs later, your previous employer died or retired? How do you get the 401 K when the time comes>

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Maychild

    almost 5 years ago

    8 comments

    This information are quite encouraging as it gives hope to as many of us who are planning for a return to the job market after some leave of absence. Thumbs up to the writers, keep up the good work!

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