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Top 10 Best and Worst States to Be a Nurse

Top 10 Best and Worst States to Be a Nurse

NursingLink.com and CareerVoyages.gov

There is a projected need for 1,001,000 nurses needed in the United States by 2016. Nurses are one of the most in demand professions in America, but with so many job openings, it begs the question: Where should you work? NursingLink is committed to providing its members with the most most pertinent career research available. Below is the 10 best and worst places to be a Nurse based on salary and job openings.


Top 10 States with the Most Nurse Job Openings

State Average Annual Job Openings
1. California
10,900
2. Florida
7,440
3. New York
6,360
4. Ohio
4,630
5. North Carolina
4,093
6. Illinois
4,020
7. New Jersey
3,700
8. Michigan
3,500
9. Georgia
3,340
10. Massachusetts
3,290

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    lalalicia

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    Reply to terrah, this has been a known fact for many years. As nurses we are the doctors right hand and the main person the patient sees at their bedside. All i can say is AMEN, we're overworked and underpaid!

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    Northstarnurses

    over 5 years ago

    70 comments

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    Description: JOIN US LIVE every Tuesday at noon & discuss the latest challenges and opportunies in nursing. Visit www.northstar-search.commoreDescription: JOIN US LIVE every Tuesday at noon & discuss the latest challenges and opportunies in nursing. Visit www.northstar-search.com lessHosted by: Northstarnurses
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    farmgirl

    over 5 years ago

    20 comments

    I have my RN (Associates) and am finishing up my Bachelors. I am not working as an RN. What are my job prospects? I am older. Is there a chance of having a preceptor to be acclimated back into the Medical setting? What is available for an older nurse?

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    terrah

    over 5 years ago

    14128 comments

    As far as I'm concerned, it seems like it does not matter what state you live in, all nurses are UNDERPAID and OVERWORKED!!!!! All of my friends are nurses...LVN and RN's, and though they may love what they do, they ALL agree that you wont get rich in the nursing field.

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    nursebunnie

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    Im in nursing here in florida,the state with the oldest population,and the oldest wages,not enough , 18.00 hr.,if you work in a nursing home its less,it may be a good field of work,but dont come to florida if your out to make money,aggrevation we have the most,after 20 years of this place,it makes you wonder why you got into the field.

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    gospellove772003

    over 5 years ago

    1252 comments

    i know excatly where to go for a good job lol

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    jmkowal3

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Bhawaii: I am an RN of 29 yrs but have not worked from 2004-06 due to 2 accidents within 1 mth of each other.Worked for a relatively new registry from May to September, "08 however they didn't offer much work but at least I got my feet wet again. Where are you getting the work with such high pay??? I have worked CVDOU and stepdown, as well as telemetry but I want more experience in the basics before I get my ACLS again and more up to the units. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. thanks....................Jeannette

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    Bhawaii

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Very inaccurate. I work nights per diem in Southern California and earn $48.23/hr. The pay is even higher in Northern California. Three 12-hour shifts a week earns me $90,000+/yr.; a 40 hour week earns me $103,000+. Into overtime? I've worked with RN's that have grossed $165,000/yr. . Come to California, we're desperate for RN's and you max out at 4 telemetry or 5 med/surg patients per shift.

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    Gwenalia

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    License Nurse Aide/ CNA make $13- $18 an hour in New Hampshire. I am working on my nursing degree and do hope to be paid much higher than what this article is reporting. I have heard Massachussets pays much, much more but, the income taxes are killer.

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    crystal031484

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am currently an LPN in Mo i make 24 dollars an hour i will complete my Rn in march and i will go up to 30 i have only been a lpn for 9 months so come to mo and work for the state 8 weeks off every year and 77 dollar a month insurance for a family of 5

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    NurseRecruiter

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I agree pronurse. These must be LPN rates. We are a union hospital in the twin cities, and starting pay for a new grad nurse is almost $29.00/hr. Experienced nurses obviously make much more than that.

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    pronurse

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    These pay scales I hope are for an LPN and not an RN, I am an RN and haven't made that low of a salary in 8 years. I am unsure where you get this data from, however, a new grad coming to Our LTC center in Southern MN (Metro area is much more) will make on the average of 24.00/ hr up to $28.00/hr depending on the position. I think perhaps Nursing Link should do another survey of this report.

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    midlifecrisis35

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    If your employer is not doing a yearly 'market analysis' of what other facilities in your area are paying, they should be. I have received two unexpected raises of $1.00/hr in three years in addition to 3-3.5% per year raises. I have been in the field 10 years, and have gone from a start of $12.50/hr in 1998 to $25.89 today. Part of that increase came from changing jobs; and from a three year attempt at unionization in which the contract gave us 6% a year. I can't complain. The rates (excluding agency RNs) are pretty consistent here as a result of these market surveys. (I'm in St. Louis and we need RNs; scrub techs as well, I'm in the OR)

    I agree that insufficient training and preceptorship is a tremendous cause of frustration for new grads. You're often being trained by a short-staffed, burned-out crew, and the consistency of preceptorship suffers. I was 6 months out of school and assigned as night charge nurse on a medicine floor over four other very experienced RNs (who didn't want the position); 52 beds, 9-10 patients/RN. Assignments were not by acuity, but by hallway, so some nights, some RNS 'got off easy' while others struggled to get their charting done by 5 am before the docs started making rounds. Needless to say, my stress level was through the roof, and when the hospital started a fellowship program to train RNs to work in surgery, I jumped at it. Haven't looked back. I remember once having 4 patients over the age of 96, one of whom didn't want to disturb me at 2 am because she thought I was 'napping', LOL. So she got up to go to the BR on her own and fell. My first 'incident' (of course writing it up and getting her hip xrayed shoots your night). By the grace of God, her hip wasn't broken.

    Anyone interested in working in STL, write me here.

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    cynicallance

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    i am very happy to see this list. however, based on salary and job openings really does not take into account what makes myself and i hope others happy as nurses. i have hollered from the highest mountain tops that a large reason for such a great demand for nurses , yet never taken into account , is....rotten training once a new grad gets to a hospital. it makes the new grad, and often those with slightly more experience feel compelled to ask "why did i get IN this profession anyway" and "i dont think this is the career for me" i would LOVE to start a grass roots push to demand and hospitals provide good training for their new grads. not a union per se, but something that says...."if you do not contractually provide at least X amount of preceptorship or fellowship time then there will be little to no-one apply at your hospital from this group." if you find this of interest please email me at lancern67@verizon.net

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    ablankenship1987

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    One thing that this article does not take into account is the fact that the cost of living is less in the lower paying states. The cost of living in California and Hawaii (the two highest paying states) is astronomical compared to that in Oklahoma, Arkansas and others on this list! I would venture to say that the reason for the $10 decrease in hourly wages from California to South Dakota is because housing, groceries, and utilities also drop in price.

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