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5 Best States for Nursing Jobs

5 Best States for Nursing Jobs

NursingLink.com and Careervoyages.gov

It’s no surprise that nurses are one of the most in demand professions. But some states have a much worse nursing shortage than others. If you are having trouble finding a job in your area, or you are just looking for a fresh start, these five states are estimated to offer the most job growth over the next decade. From sunny California to bustling New York, there is a nursing position for you waiting in one of these five great states.

(In alphabetical order)


California

Florida

New York

Ohio

Pennsylvania



Next: Nursing in California >>


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    ptorrez

    about 6 years ago

    6 comments

    I AM AN LPN READY TO BRIGDE INTO AN RN PROGRAM AS SOON AS I CAN FIND ONE , THERE IS SUUCH A SHORTAGE BUT THE STATE LEAVES NO ROOM FOR ERROR I STARTED SCHOOL FROM THE BEGINNING GED,CNA ALL PREREQ'S DONE AND NOW MY SCIENCE CLASSES ARE EXPIRING NOW WHAT? LPN IN CHICAGO CAN USE SOME HELP?

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    gwenf

    about 6 years ago

    2 comments

    Lela2780 - what's your location? Have you tried going the Jr College route? I'm in a program that's competitive to get into, but there is no "waiting list", so to speak. I was accepted twice before I was able to actually accept my seat in the program. And yes it's considered a good program. Our NCLEX pass rate is something like 99%. After ASN degree, you can get a fast-track BSN. You can do an RN to BSN degree through University of Illinois in 16 months.

  • Kai_honu_avatar_max50

    lacordes

    about 6 years ago

    2 comments

    yea, its true. Nursing schools (at least here in California) are so impacted that it's very difficult to get in. Many schools have lotteries and its completely up to chance if you are accepted. Your chances might be better with a private school, but their tuition is extremely high. it's whatever you're willing to do...

  • Weekend_at_lela_s_010_max50

    Lela2780

    about 6 years ago

    10 comments

    Thats awesome! If You can get into Nursing School. I can't find a program that doesn't have a three to four year waiting list. And I can't find anyone to help me out. I've emailed and called everywhere. I even considered joining the army to get my education. It's pitiful!

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    healthcare_

    about 6 years ago

    6 comments

    Some people just don't realize what the cost of living is like in California --- particularly in the Bay Area. I've got a facility that is willing to pay a nurse manager of ER (who would be under a Director) $130 - $160k. But when you run a cost analysis calculator against say even some place like Denver or Dallas, and the difference is amazing.

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    Raejeanz

    about 6 years ago

    6 comments

    I am a nursing student in NW IN. I would be willing to relocate to finish school in CA, can someone provide me with info regarding schooling. Raejean rivich69@yahoo.com

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    2brownies

    about 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I am not at all surprised at the shortage in the Ohio area. First of all I am a Bachelor's prepared RN in Ohio and currently work in management after 10+ years in ER and floated PRN to other short areas such as PACU, Pain Mgt....Anyway employer's are not as loyal to nurse's as they want and expect nurse's to be with them. Incentive's have lessened, staffing is horrible, assignments almost unable to accomplish all while there is a lack of support from those that make the decisions. While increasing wages is wonderful and needed considering; other incentive's must also play a part, such as paid sick, bonus when working short staffed, rewards for those willing to commit--there are more incentive's to bring on new hires than given to those who have been loyal for years, which is why many seasoned nurse's leave not only experienced area's but the field as well. I believe that the profession of nursing has so much value and need and we are a profession that globaly care's for clients--however someone, somewhere in political and administrative heaven can't or won't recognize that although monetary incentives are great, but there are legalities to how nurse's should practice as set forth by the ONA and that when "we" feel our license's are at stake because of unsafe working environments, we should be listened to.

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    bandujar

    about 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I strongly believe the task force should expand their search towards Puerto Rico nurses. The salary in Puerto Rico is still not up to par and there are alot of English speaking nurses. Nurses in Puerto Rico are taught to work in every department instead of being placed in one specific area. This technique works well due to the shortage of nurses. I will be graduating as an RN soon and I decided to study in Puerto Rico because its much cheaper than in the states, but the material is all the same and in English text. I am originally from Brooklyn,NY and I would return if the price is right because the cost of living in NYC is expensive.

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    cmckeag

    about 6 years ago

    18 comments

    It takes more than an average hourly wage to entice workers. Think about climate, taxes, price of real estate, cost of living, etc. Once that figures in, it's hard to see how California and New York can be on top. I can make close to the same wage, and a home is a third of the cost. Of course, taxes are horrible.

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