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Nursing Resume Do's and Don’ts Part I

Nursing Resume Do's and Don’ts Part I

Is your resume up to date?

Monster Resume Expert by Kim Isaacs

Although a good resume can’t get you a job, a poor resume will keep you from getting one. A resume is a professional marketing tool, a written record of your accomplishments and professional credentials. Because it usually represents the first impression a prospective employer will have of you, your resume must be top-notch in format, content, and appearance. Follow these simple guidelines to improve the impression your resume makes.

What to do

DO use a chronological format. Start by listing your current or most recent job and work back from there. This is the format most employers are looking for, and anything else makes them suspicious and impatient. Although every rule has exceptions, stick to this format to be safe.

DO focus on your accomplishments and more interesting or marketable skills and experiences. Your resume should highlight the best that you have to offer, not read like a job description. If you’re a staff nurse, the interviewer will expect you to have provided patient care and administered medications. Instead, include special activities such as conducting patient and family teaching, making presentations to outside groups, sitting on interdisciplinary committees, and budgeting and scheduling responsibility. If your experience is limited, focus on the more significant clinical skills, such as ventilator care, chemotherapy administration, and attaining I.V. certification.

DO print your resume on good quality paper and with good quality print. Most laser printers will do the job. If you don’t have a good printer, put your resume on a disk and bring it to a local printer or office services company that has a letter-quality printer. Ask to see samples of good-quality resume paper. Chose one that is white or off-white, never use colored paper or paper with designs or borders. Make sure the print on your resume is crisp, dark, sharp and clear.

What NOT to do

DON’T list personal information about your health, height and weight, marital status, and so on. This information shouldn’t be part of a job search process. In fact, asking about such matters in an interview is illegal, so don’t offer this information. You want the interviewer to focus on your job-related experience, not your personal attributes.

DON’T list hobbies and personal activities such as reading, skiing, and sewing. Discussing these in an interview is fine if you’re asked—they can even help establish rapport with a prospective employer. But this information, just like your height and weight, doesn’t belong on your resume.

DON’T list references with names and addresses. In fact, you don’t even need to say “References Available Upon Request.” If employers want references, they’ll ask for them. Keep your resume free of unnecessary information.

This article was originally published on Monster.com.

Next: Nursing Resume Dos and Don’t Part II >>

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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Okon2

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    Thanks for this information, is very timely!

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    Gingerkmullins

    almost 6 years ago

    8 comments

    Thank you so much for all these wonderful tips. Very helpful indeed. :O)

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    jessica_nelson9977

    almost 6 years ago

    78 comments

    I always have to laugh when I see a resume that includes what the person's personal interests are like, "I also enjoy water skiing and knitting". How is that going to help to get a job and why would people need to know that esp. if you a looking for a job in health care!?!?!?!?

  • Nurse_link_photo_max50

    dfwrecruit4u

    over 6 years ago

    10 comments

    As a nurse recuiter, I have seen my share of resumes. You want to make sure that you do not add information that could lead to identity theft. Please keep your personal information (social security number, date of birth, nursing license number) off your resume. This information does not belong there. This information will be required once you are in the process of being hired and you will then be able to disclose it during the application process.

  • Nurse_quiz_26_normal_max50

    ashley919

    over 6 years ago

    8 comments

    these are really great tips very good to know all of this.

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    jmana4of6

    over 6 years ago

    2 comments

    HELP! I am a graduate practical nurse and have no idea how or what to put on my resume. All my life I've been a secretary and I don't know the first thing to write or how to format my resume. Can someone please help me; sending a copy of yours will truly be appreciated (of course I expect false dates & such); I just need an idea. Thank you all.

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    Nursingcareermanager

    over 6 years ago

    6 comments

    These are fantastic tips and important to landing the best job especially the, ' DO focus on your accomplishments and more interesting or marketable skills and experiences. Your resume should highlight the best that you have to offer, not read like a job description'.

  • Chi_girl_max50

    HELGA

    almost 7 years ago

    2 comments

    This is really good. i have learnt alot that i don't know before about resume writing

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    almost 7 years ago

    This is a great resource for anyone looking for a job, not just nurses.

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    vickielee1970

    almost 7 years ago

    808 comments

    First all of this is good advice. But please, if you get the interview, take your printed sheet of Up-to-Date References. I have seen too many people come to interviews without a printed sheet of references and scramble to fill one out as they wait for their turn interviewing. Afterwards the interviewer and others try to call those references and if the numbers are old or people have left the positions, it is very hard to give some a chance at a job when you cant verify their work history or quality. Make sure your references know you are using them, so they expect the call, if there is a better time to contact a certain reference, it doesn't hurt to give that information either. I have made a lot of cold calls that went no where because of poor information. Rarely does anyone take the time to call more than once or call you back for better information. Do yourself a favor if you don't have the time or skills to set up an excellent resume, pay a professional, it will be money well spent. And of course if you have some skill, you can copy it to computer for later reference and to update.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    about 7 years ago

    Good advice! Here are some additional things that I have incorporated into my resume. Since this will be a 2nd career for me, I did a functional resume instead. I also added a skills section highlighting what I have learned in nursing school and what I have learned in my past jobs. The skills section is a good way to sell myself, especially since I will be a newbie in this profession.

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    maryrn62200

    about 7 years ago

    14 comments

    Thanks for the advice; I'll have to update my resume and remove my references.

  • Vw_1971_bug_008_max50

    maryrn62200

    about 7 years ago

    14 comments

    Thanks for the advice; I'll have to update my resume and remove my references.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    about 7 years ago

    Common sense! But good info to follow.

  • Nana_and_grandkids_minus_noah_max50

    charlita

    about 7 years ago

    2976 comments

    I found this article to be very informative.

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