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Nursing Resume Do's and Don’ts Part I

Nursing Resume Do's and Don’ts Part I

Is your resume up to date?

Monster Resume Expert by Kim Isaacs

Although a good resume can’t get you a job, a poor resume will keep you from getting one. A resume is a professional marketing tool, a written record of your accomplishments and professional credentials. Because it usually represents the first impression a prospective employer will have of you, your resume must be top-notch in format, content, and appearance. Follow these simple guidelines to improve the impression your resume makes.

What to do

DO use a chronological format. Start by listing your current or most recent job and work back from there. This is the format most employers are looking for, and anything else makes them suspicious and impatient. Although every rule has exceptions, stick to this format to be safe.

DO focus on your accomplishments and more interesting or marketable skills and experiences. Your resume should highlight the best that you have to offer, not read like a job description. If you’re a staff nurse, the interviewer will expect you to have provided patient care and administered medications. Instead, include special activities such as conducting patient and family teaching, making presentations to outside groups, sitting on interdisciplinary committees, and budgeting and scheduling responsibility. If your experience is limited, focus on the more significant clinical skills, such as ventilator care, chemotherapy administration, and attaining I.V. certification.

DO print your resume on good quality paper and with good quality print. Most laser printers will do the job. If you don’t have a good printer, put your resume on a disk and bring it to a local printer or office services company that has a letter-quality printer. Ask to see samples of good-quality resume paper. Chose one that is white or off-white, never use colored paper or paper with designs or borders. Make sure the print on your resume is crisp, dark, sharp and clear.

What NOT to do

DON’T list personal information about your health, height and weight, marital status, and so on. This information shouldn’t be part of a job search process. In fact, asking about such matters in an interview is illegal, so don’t offer this information. You want the interviewer to focus on your job-related experience, not your personal attributes.

DON’T list hobbies and personal activities such as reading, skiing, and sewing. Discussing these in an interview is fine if you’re asked—they can even help establish rapport with a prospective employer. But this information, just like your height and weight, doesn’t belong on your resume.

DON’T list references with names and addresses. In fact, you don’t even need to say “References Available Upon Request.” If employers want references, they’ll ask for them. Keep your resume free of unnecessary information.

This article was originally published on Monster.com.

Next: Nursing Resume Dos and Don’t Part II >>

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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    gitachakraborty

    about 7 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been working 12 yearsin nursing and 10 years primary health care development project and now i am practicing Psycho counselor and Pstchotherapy consultant ,May I study in MSC Nursing . Should I get the chance and I want to scholarships also for study ,
    Thanks
    Sincerely Yours ,
    Gita Chakraborty

  • Hillcountry05_max50

    sommersby4ever

    about 7 years ago

    12 comments

    Excellent advice giving in this article. It works if you follow the tips above.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    SuZeQu

    about 7 years ago

    190 comments

    Thanks so much for the wonderful tips. This was not something that we were taught 32 yrs ago. I've been fortunate to have a daughter who graduated with a business degree and a degree in HIM to help me along. Thanks again! S Hanks RN

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    SuZeQu

    about 7 years ago

    190 comments

    Thanks so much for the wonderful tips. This was not something that we were taught 32 yrs ago. I've been fortunate to have a daughter who graduated with a business degree and a degree in HIM to help me along. Thanks again! S Hanks RN

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    SuZeQu

    about 7 years ago

    190 comments

    Thanks so much for the wonderful tips. This was not something that we were taught 32 yrs ago. I've been fortunate to have a daughter who graduated with a business degree and a degree in HIM to help me along. Thanks again! S Hanks RN

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    kimberlyseay

    about 7 years ago

    2 comments

    learned something new...need to update my resume and remove References upon request! thanks

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Candoy1118

    about 7 years ago

    2 comments

    I recently passed the RN Board Exam and I have no work experience and wonder what strategys I should use in my resume with this situation.

  • Nurse_gail_2009_max50

    gailp

    about 7 years ago

    28 comments

    this article doesn't give me any new info. I, too, subscribe to the 10 yr rule, and am moving things off my resume that are > 10 yr ago. I keep them on an extra page, in case I might need to reference them. but it dpes not get sent out. I also have a CV, more useful for education. I am currenty finding it hard to get a new position, either too qualified with MSN or not the right experience, or... could it be age?? Currently it's the hardest time I've had looking for a job, never been without one involuntarily for this long before (2 weeks now and counting). Interviews galore, but inconsderate folks who do not respond. I keep the CV up to date and now everyone gets that. So, I have a short version of the CV that only goes back 10 yrs. Eastern NC does not appear to have a nurse shortage. COnsidering a move within the year, as son-in-law may go to law school out of state. I am now nervous about getting a job wherever we go. (I signed on as the extra parent while he studies and grandson would have it no other way).

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    about 7 years ago

    Meadowwolf, I have never heard the advice of removing dates from a resume. I am older than you but went to school later. I often wondered if I would have been interviewed if they could have guessed my age. Maybe just a letter outlining your experience would do the trick. I have heard to not go back more than 10 to 15 years. There are resume books out there just for the medical/nursing profession.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Meadowwolf

    over 7 years ago

    2 comments

    I graduated from a 3 year RN Diploma program in 1977. I have been persistent in taking classes to obtain my BSN, which I received in May 2006. A career advisor reviewed my chronologic resume and told me to remove all the dates in order to increase the possibility of getting an interview as the perspective employer can not know that I am in my 50's.. She also said go back no more that 10-15 yrs. on prior work assignments. She said the employer will respond negatively when they note my approximate age and interview the younger nurses instead. I have also been trained in Legal Nurse Consulting but again can not access any work arrangements. Which type of resume, chronological or functional is more widely expected and accepted? I have responded to ads using the chrono. resume and have received no responses. I need to move out of the position in Home Health into a position that has more stable working hours. Can you please give me your best pointers? As far as the LNC training I have tried to get the LNC experience by "interning" with several attorneys but had no luck. What is the best actions that you can offer? Thank You in Advance, Pamela S. Johnson, RN, LNC, BSN.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    blanca

    over 7 years ago

    4 comments

    hello, I'm a newly certified M.A and finding it hard to find a job, can you offer some tips on what to put on resume that will be looked at .

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