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Rising Demand (and Pay!) for LPNs

Rising Demand (and Pay!) for LPNs

In about 18 months to two years, you can get education that qualifies you to take the licensing exam for LPN and practice at that level in your state. What does an LPN do? What is their salary range? Where do they practice? It’s important to know about all levels of nursing when you are deciding how to enter the field. The LPN is a widely valued and use licensed. Here are some basics:

As an LPN, you can provide care to the ill and elderly. A very traditional place for LPN’s to practice is the long-term care setting. But, also, LPNs are found in acute facilities. When you have completed your education and passed the licensing exam, you will have the experience to practice basic nursing skills (but, “basic” is, actually, quite wide ranging). Even IV care is entrusted to the LPN level of nursing. The work of the LPN is not easy. It is patient based and hard work. But getting to know and care for a variety of patients is rewarding. This is a level of nursing for those who want to be on the front lines of the field; those who want day to day contact with patients and their families.

What can you expect as pay? Advance for Nurses has an article available on-line called the 2008 National LPN Salary Survey. It has great information in it about salaries for LPN, practice sites and changes in practice in the last few years. More than 2500 nurses responded to their survey.

Here are some highlights from their findings:

1. The average pay for an LPN in the U.S. in 2008 was $41,600 per year.

2. This is an increase from 2006 when the salary average was $38,184.

3. Alaska has the highest pay (based on four respondents). The pay there is $29 per hour.

4. Connecticut is pretty high also, $25.58 per hour.

5. Idaho came in lowest, at a pay of $14.67 per hour.

Some people get sign–on bonuses, but fewer than several years ago. However, the good news was that if you did get a sign-on bonus, it was pretty good, at $1500.

The change for LPNs seems to be where they are practicing. They seem to be expanding their range from long term facilitates and acute care settings to many different settings both profit and non-profit. These include office settings, community clinics, home health agencies (where pay may be better), hospice care organizations, assisted living agencies, schools, specialty hospitals, and correctional facilities. Also, insurance agencies and government run facilities are hiring LPNs.

I wonder if the state of the economy makes LPN more hire-able. Organizations that traditionally would use RNs, may be finding that LPNs offer the same level of care and quality at a more reasonable cost.

Many LPNs are also getting higher credentials. Some are going back to a school for Bachelor’s degrees and Master’s degrees, but other credentialing that is possible and helpful for the LPN includes:

l. Advanced Cardiac Life Support

2. Specialty certification in IV care

3. Certification in wound care

4. Certification in long-term care, hospice care, or palliative care.

LPNs who are credentialed in these areas tend to make a little more money a year, an average of $2100 more.

When you are deciding the path to follow in nursing, or if you are currently an LPN in the nursing field, take a look at the entirety of this article in Advance for Nursing, to judge where you are, and where you may be able to go. It is quite interesting to see the changes, even since 2006.

Next: 2008 LPN Salary Table >>


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  • Angela_max50

    camonurse

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I totally agree with swellslpn

    Angela
    LPN in Mississippi

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    NotManyofMe

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    @MSSAFFIRA your right there is nothing wrong with hiring new grads I encourage it!!! But I know first hand how dangerous it can be for the patient when the new grads arent oriented with patients by someone with experience. Especially in the pediatric field of homecare!!! I have picked up cases where the patient has returned home from the hospital after being injured by a new nurse who didn't know how to connect a vent to a trach and forgot to take off the nose to the trach which has a microban paper honeycomb filter. Humidified air had saturated the filter and clogged it and the nurse didnt have the o2 sat monitor on and the child almost suffocated to death. The mother saved the childs life after she realized the nurse couldn't realize what was wrong with the child. LTC is not for me!!! LOL I love my pediatrics too much!! Hopefully things will pick up and nurses can find their nitch but I see some suffering going on now in the healthcare field that has me wondering what is in store for us for the foreseeable future!!! I'm not liking the fact that healthcare agencies are starting to reduce wages and refuse to offer insurance!!! that is crazy!!! The VA center in dayton ohio expects lpns to work for 12.50 an hour in the ICU department!!!! It is absolute chaos in there if you don't know what your doing you will burn out so fast!!! They use the hell out of you and leave you with a sour taste in your mouth and a sore butt!!! Get my drift!!

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    shebaby44

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    How does this web site get you federal non repayable money for school?

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    sharont

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I've been an LVN for 25 years and I have seen a lot of changes in that time. When I first started, LVN's could not start primary IV's. Now we can flush PICC's, its been a pretty amazing process. I've done everything from QA in home health to being a floor nurse at a hospital and now working as a charge nurse in a LTC facility. I have made as much as 27.00 per hour. What bothers me, is that we have new RN's and LVN's who are doing this for a check and not giving good nursing care because they seem to lack passion. Its not a calling for them. LVN's are cost effective and I believe that with healthcare reform looming, there will be cut backs in the nursing profession. Companies will no longer be able to afford the RN that they are paying 40 per hour to do the same thing an LVN can do for half the price. It could also reverse, an insurance companies including medicare and medicaid can demand that care must be provided by an RN to support payment to facilities. This will be an interesting turn of events. Good Luck to all, were gonna need it!

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    luvn5bugs

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been an LVN in Texas for 14 years and have noticed a trend of MA's being hired more often because of the savings in $$. Because of this I am currently in process of obtaining ADN. I'm confident that things will pick up for all nurses as the baby boom generation hits the health care industry full force in the near future. The majority of Tex. hosp. hire RN's only and the same is true of the cash flow for RN's in the home care setting ($$). Currently the base pay for LVN is around 21.00, higher depending upon years experience. My suggestion is that any LVN who is willing and able should go back to school and get RN before the majority of baby boomers arrive.

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    mssaffira

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    @ NotManyofMe: Patient care is really suffering due to all the new grad hires. There is nothing wrong w. hiring them, but there needs to be a healthy mix. I have only been nursing for a year and a half and have learned worlds more than the knowledge I came out of school with. I am working with a TON of new grads and it['s frustrating- most of them don't seem like they get it- they come in to do a 'job', but not really take care of the residents. But they are able to keep their jobs because the company doesn't have to dish out a lot for their salary.

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    mssaffira

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    I keep hearing that hiring will start back up come mid January. I'm hoping. I have a good schedule, but I don't feel like my position is secure. The company got bought out and they don't have Baylor nurses (Sat and Sun 16hr shifts+ 8hrs of incentive pay). They are honoring my contract, but I feel like it's just a matter of time until they get rid of me. It's a LTC facility and there are only 3 of us Baylors left.

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    fuzzybug

    over 4 years ago

    12 comments

    Show me a company/business/office/facility that will hire and train a newly minted LPN and offer anything besides part time or per diem. In New Jersey many of the doctor's offices are now using CMA's instead of nurses. There is a hiring freeze in many LTC facilities and the hospitals in the area do not use LPN's.

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    NotManyofMe

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    In Ohio LPN's are so abundant that the companies that are hiring are dropping the wages so fast it's crazy!!! I have been an LPN for over 3 years with the last two in home care doing pediatric end of life care. Decided to look elsewhere for more employment due to my companies census being low and needing extra hours. I have literally applied at over 40 companies and there is no responses. Confused and dismayed at this I consulted several recruitment agencies and my school career center and was blown away by what I heard. First off there is really no shortage of nurses like the government is portraying and locally the companies hiring are looking for new LPN's to save a ton of money instead of hiring experienced nurses. And working in a hospital in certain parts of ohio as an LPN is history!! I noticed other cities in other states still employ LPN's in hospitals and pay them pretty well (large cities usually). But if you have the opportunity to go back and get your RN go and get it!! It is much more versatile than LPN licensures. If I have learned anything is that RN's have it made as case managers in homecare!!!!! 5-10 visits a day 5-6 days a week usually home by 5pm and making on avg 80k a year. With benefits!!! Oh well i have 9 months left so we will see!!!! Pittsburg here I come!!!!!

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    Sadranch79525

    over 4 years ago

    4 comments

    Where I work the RN has stated that she refuses to pass meds or do skin treatments because she has not been orientated to the floor, She has been employed by our company for several months.

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    topcat

    over 4 years ago

    4 comments

    LPN's also work hard in school and in many cases are more skilled in actual procedures than the RN's are. I am working as a Nurse Case Manager for disability and do great in my field. I think there will be plenty of work for all of us, both RN and LPN. I am grateful that my RN counter parts do not downgrade my roll in this chosen field.

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    Old_School_Nurse

    over 4 years ago

    26 comments

    I used to work in New Orleans, La. Several LPN's where I worked, including myself, were IV certified--To draw blood and start IV's and hang all but blood, chemo and few other things. We were trained in wound care--certified (if you paid for it out of pocket-no reimbursement), we did fingersticks, ekg's, basic resp. treatments. Where I am now (the district headquarters for where we were), IV certified means the ability to hang plain IVF's and some piggybacks, no phlebotomy, ekg's or basic resp treatments. As I was told my function is to 'pass pills'. RN's are strained and burned out so fast. The RN's going back to school for degrees spend the majority of their working time doing on-line school work which is okay as they are related to or BFF with the DON or other nurse managers. Most RN's are intimidated by what some LPN's can do and go to many lengths to have them removed from patient care units. Truly sad for team nursing but mostly for patient care.

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    swellslpn

    over 4 years ago

    4 comments

    We deserve a raise some of us work as hard if not harder than some of the RN's. We LPN's do not receive the respect and acknowledgment we deserve.
    LPN Mississippi

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