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Why You Should Choose a BSN

Why You Should Choose a BSN

Monster Contributing Writer Lisette Hilton

Whether you have a diploma, an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) or a bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN), landing a nursing job these days usually isn’t a problem. Advancing in the profession, though, is another matter if you hold less than a BSN, according to experts.

But is the BSN always a necessity? Is an associate’s degree alone enough to open the door to a rewarding nursing career?

The bottom line is that choosing a nursing degree depends on the individual’s needs and goals, says Donita Qualey, RN, MN, president of the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing and professor of nursing at Delgado Community College in New Orleans.

“If the career goals are always to work at the bedside, then the associate’s degree is perfectly fine,” Qualey says. “But if you’re younger and want to teach or go higher in management, then you would go on for your advanced degree.”

Four Reasons to Get Your BSN:

          #1 Lower Nursing Degrees Under Scrutiny

         #2 Considerations for Second-Career Nurses

         
#3 Degree as a Stepping-Stone

         
#4 Advancement, Earning Power


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    kaoni2000

    almost 6 years ago

    12 comments

    I agree with Poliwog. I am 45, graduated as an RN June 2007 and now I want to go for my BSN. I am not sure that I want to "MOVE OFF THE FLOOR". I enjoy and WANT to stay bedside. The only thing holding me back is having more student loans. I can only benefit myself and my patients by furthering my education.

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    Poliwog

    almost 6 years ago

    8 comments

    I resent this -
    “If the career goals are always to work at the bedside, then the associate’s degree is perfectly fine,” Qualey says. “But if you’re younger and want to teach or go higher in management, then you would go on for your advanced degree.”
    Why would you have to be younger to want to teach or go higher in mangement? Im 42 yrs old and in an ADN program and definitely planning to go straight into a BSN program and eventually obtain my Master's. I have two friends in their 50's who share the same goals I do. Education has nothing to do with age.

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    slh25625

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    The hospital I work for only gives a BSN 50 cents an hour more than an ADN. So I don't think the cost of the extra education is worth it right now.

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    racynote

    almost 6 years ago

    10 comments

    I know this is true but I don't have to like it esp. since the nurses that I personally know with higher degrees do not even consider doing patient care. What will happen with the nursing shortage then?

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    snowbunnyRN

    almost 6 years ago

    254 comments

    I am a 51 yr old with a ADN and I'm considering going on for my BSN! I won't be making a whole lot more money with a BSN, however, I'm thinking that I'll be working probably well into my late 60's-70's and I don't know if my health will be good for doing bedside nsg!! I'm thinking I could get into management or possibly school nursing when and if my health declines in my "old age" !! I have to wait at least a year before I'll pursue this, because I'm presently paying for my 20 yr old son attending an LPN program!!

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    maryrn62200

    almost 6 years ago

    14 comments

    I am a proud holder of a Diploma in Nursing. I have a great deal of respect for those of us with a BSN because I feel that having a BSN just makes the profession as a whole; more professional which may lead into higher wages or salaries. I started in nursing as a CNA in 1979. I was a CNA for 3 years before going back to school to became a LPN. 17 years later, I went back to school and was graduated as a Diploma RN at the age of 40. I personally believe that learning should never stop and I hope that I can continue learning and be graduated as a BSN before I retire. I encourage any and all young nurses to go for the gusto!

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    elpasofire

    almost 6 years ago

    6 comments

    I agree that a BSN does not make you a more competent nurse. Competence is somehting the individual must personally attain. I am about to graduate in Dec with my BSN, but before I attained my ADN I ws a Paramedic, so I had lots of experience. The ADN made me feel more complete, and my knowledge, skill and experience showed. I returned for my BSN because I want to be a FNP. But with my background, I am the Bioterrorism Coordinator for the Fire Department in my City.

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    ablack

    almost 6 years ago

    46 comments

    I have my BA in a non-related nursing field. I have looked into getting my MSN at the local University, but I can't afford to quit my job. I have to pay bills and I am trying to buy a house. I just don't have the money or the time to go to a full time MSN program. If there was a part time MSN program that had clinicals at night I would choose that in a heartbeat, but the University forbids students to work at all during the first year because of clinicals. The goal of getting my ADN is much more attainable. With the shortage of nurses... you would think states would take extra steps to make sure there were night programs available for those who want their BSN or MSN...

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    jorjasmith

    almost 6 years ago

    10 comments

    I'm planning on getting my associate's degree so as to be an RN, I already have a bachelor's degree in another area of study. I've done the research and as I already have a B.S. I will be able to go on to pursuing my master's degree - I live in Florida by the way so for each state you would probably have to do your own research.

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    NurseKitty08

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    I had been a LVN for years (thoes that dont know its the equivalent of a LPN but Texas is the only state that give the LVN credentials). When I initially started in a teaching facility (County Hospitals) one could work at any level of nursing ie... critical care, ER ect. I did that and presently credentialed in the areas. I obtained my BS in Pre Law along the way with a Masters in Social Work. I have no desire to obtain a BSN for I have what I need for any capacity for dealing with the public.

    I agree with some of the posters it is assinine to believe that higher credentials a great nurse one does make. In all the critical care experience I have the nurses who were the worse and I rarely interacted with them because of the demeanor were the BSN and MSN. They knew very little pertaining to patient care and safety. If one has been a nurse for any length of time you know that patients are not textbook and that is what these nurses look for and not the obvious. Thier critical care skill lack real nursing judgement. I toot my own horn because I am passionate concerning the care of others and can run rings around my own and several other ER Directors in critical care situation and am often told to apply for management positions. I have no desire I did that as a LVN and all I got was high blood pressure as a result of constantly have to listen to all the bit#ch whinning and complaining.

    I dont discredit thoes in management positions but I do know from experience it does not make you a better nurse. I am delighted to be a ER/ICU nurse and in actuality all I have are the RN credentials behind my old LVN name. I have always been a excellent nurse... but that's just me!

    I would say that it furthering your education is important if you want to teach or in a specialized field such as NP or anethestist but other than that you will just have the prestige of saying you have a higher degree hell I got that now and what? lol

    To the person who deemed that AAS and ADN will be phased out.... WELL MY LOVE AS A LVN I HEARD THE SAME THING FOR THE PAST 20 YEARS AND GUESS WHAT..... I AND MY PEERS WERE STILL LVN'S now how about that.... ADN's and AAS's arent going anywhere its that mentaility that spreads the rumors which excite the panic saddens me as a Nurse...
    but in your defense.... if you say so! Guess what from LVN to RN my pay only expanded to about a $7500 difference I already had the pay... I just got the credentials...

    LOVE MY CRITICAL CARE NURSING IN TEXAS

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    MizzSwinney

    almost 6 years ago

    10 comments

    Although a BSN does give more insight into nursing care, I feel that having a BSN is not necessary to be a competent nurse. Experience, good work ethic, committment to patient care, and opportunities we are given makes a competent nurse. I know LPNs that can run RN, BSN's under the table. Those letters behind your name shouldnt determine your worth as a nurses. If you wanna pursue higher degrees, that is great. I, personally, plan on becoming a nurse practitioner. But to anyone going into nursing school don't sweat if its for an ADN or BSN. Time and money is key. An ADN will get your foot in the door, a BSN will ensure you have both feet in the door. Everyone should pursue a degree to how it fits into there own lifestyle.

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    Tues41

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    In response to Debrafloreslvn74: I recently completed an LPN-RN bridge program. I had college credits from 15 yrs earlier, but my chemistry courses were too old ( 8 yrs or less), so I had to retake those along with A&P 1&2, Psych, and Nursing math, I also decide to take Microbiology, and took all of the non- nursing courses, to get them out of the way, I was working full-time so I went part-time and it took me 2 yrs to complete the prereqs, along with the non-nursing courses. When I entered the program I only had to focus on the nursing courses. The waiting list at the Community college in my area was a year, so I petitioned for my Associate of Arts degree. I entered the program in Jan., 2006 the Bridge program was in two parts, which I completed in May,2006, we were off for the summer, and we merged with the non-lpn students when we returned in late Aug., 2006 we did 5 weeks ea of specialty nursing: Peds, OB, Psych, had Xmas break from early Dec. to the 1st of Jan. 2007. When we returned in Jan 07,we had 4 weeks of Leadership/Management then in Feb, 07 we started Advanced Med-Surg, which was suppossed to be our critical care rotation, but they decided that Med Surg was more important. we graduated mid May of 2007. Remember each state is different.

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    msjacalyn

    almost 6 years ago

    44 comments

    "Reaching" -who here would discourage you from continuing your education?? No Way, go for it. In the mean time your MA schooling may help you get a job at your local hospital (who usually will reimburse for furthering your ed). As for additional funding, there are many scholarship programs to sign up for through the school your attending for nursing. I recently found a book at my local library "The Big Blue Book for Grants, Scholarships, Fellowships and Loans" -great resource. As for RN / BSN?... I spoke with the Director of Nursing at my work ( who has her Masters) and she definately encouraged going all the way. I will be speaking with counselors at both my community college as well as the University to come to my final decision (considering time and expenses).

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    Livin2Care

    about 6 years ago

    40 comments

    From my experience working with the federal government for seven years in Washington D.C., I can truly testify to the fact that people who strive to go directly to management positions are those individuals who would have never been able to work competently in the "trenches" or at the bedside for that matter

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    CRNA2B

    about 6 years ago

    6 comments

    Debrafloreslvn74 -- forgive me, I think I'm readying these chronicologically backwards -- But NO, every community college I have talked to has LPN-RN bridge programs (ADN can take about 3 years with having to do prerequisites, deadlines to apply, etc.), but I don't imagine the bridge takes near 2 years, but I could be wrong. One problem you may come across, for example, I have been doing medical transcription and/or editing for 13 years, and none of my A&P, pharm, ect., science credits are transferrable because they are too old, so I have to take those again, and you would have to check out the community colleges; all schools are different. I bet you could test out of the A&P being an LPN. course my community college charges $100 to test out of A&P, and even when you pass, you still have to take A&P II, so you never know til you talk to a particular school.

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