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Top 10 Highest Paying Nursing Specialties

Top 10 Highest Paying Nursing Specialties

NursingLink

After nurses finish nursing school, choosing the right nursing specialty becomes their chief focus. With so many specialties to choose from, many prospective nurses find it difficult to just pick one, but with nearly every specialty requiring candidates to pass a series of exams and fulfill a period of on-the-job training, time is of the essence!

Pay should not be your only considering when deciding on a specialty, but the list below of the highest paying nursing specialties provides a good primer on which types of nurses have the greatest earning potential.

1) Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist – $135,000

2) Nurse Researcher – $95,000

3) Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner – $95,000

4) Certified Nurse Midwife – $84,000

5) Pediatric Endocrinology Nurse – $81,000

6) Orthopedic Nurse – $81,000

7) Nurse Practitioner – $78,000

8) Clinical Nurse Specialist – $76,000

9) Gerontological Nurse Practitioner – $75,000

10) Neonatal Nurse – $74,000



First Specialty: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist >>


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    krensink

    about 2 years ago

    2 comments

    essentially you will be paid the same no matter what unit you work within a hospital.. a staff nurse, whether he/she be a psychiatric, L&D, or ICU nurse, will be paid whatever the hospital pays their RNs. you need to specialize by getting a MSN or move off the unit (nurse educator, etc.) to get paid more - or work MANY years and get paid big bucks for the experience alone. trying to figure out myself what graduate program to apply to that isn't floor nursing and can make good money...

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    kikilee123

    about 2 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been a nurse 8 years and not once have made these numbers and I work in a hospital setting.

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    RNinSpfdMO

    almost 3 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been an R.N. with an associates degree. There are not many jobs out there right now for nurses that don't want to do "hands on" nursing that don't have a bachelors degree. The pay listed above is alot higher than most nursing jobs. I am currently looking for a job and have found that reputable places with good benefits pay in the 40,000s.

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    cathyreynolds

    almost 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Wow! Nurses are payed with those amount? Sadly I can't take how nurses do their training. But I'm sure it's all worth it for nurses since they've encountered a lot to be where they are. 2012 WSOP

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    Mskitty27

    over 3 years ago

    2 comments

    I am 28 with three kids it is imparative that I set an example for my girls that it's not to late to go for your dreams and most important I want them to look up at me and say I wanna succeed to!!

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    khaingzarchi

    over 3 years ago

    2 comments

    Wow. this is very inspiring. i'm new in here and i just graduated from RN program and trying to take NCLEX on march 7th. Any tips? please, wish me luck and then after, laying a RN position. :)

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    charmlessgirl21

    about 4 years ago

    4 comments

    Hi, Nursing family! I need some advice: I'm applying to UCLA's Nursing Program next year and I'm asking all you young twenty-something nurses which field you feel is as stimulating and rewarding as it is LUCRATIVE. I'm leaning towards Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, but I'm not sure. Any thoughts or comments would be most helpful! Thank you:)

    j.

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    mskbsn06

    about 4 years ago

    23484 comments

    Pyschiatric Nurse Practitioner, now that it is my favorite. I am working towards this goal.

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    schoolnurse39

    over 4 years ago

    4 comments

    A poster asks, "What about a National Registered Certified Medical Assistant. What do we stand for?"

    As unlicensed, assistive personnel you stand for medical office staff working under the umbrella of the professional staff's (but not the RN's) license. RN's/LPN's/LVN's/CNA's are individually licensed and, therefore, are able to work independently and autonomously.

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    FydawgRN

    over 4 years ago

    36 comments

    Megrk2004: Even if the job description says, "1-2 years experience required," go ahead and apply for it anyway. 1) If no one else applies for that position with experience, Human Resources is sometimes under pressure to fill it and will hire you anyway. 2) When not if asked the question, "What do you have to offer as a new grad?" You bring a completely open mind to that facilities procedures.

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    sunshinenursing

    over 4 years ago

    4 comments

    Megrk2004, I suggest you take a nursing home position that is still considered experience. You doctor you resume up after that, get the steady income coming in. Take some specialty courses, I guarantee you will be where you want to be soon. I'm an LVN and I get RN salary because of CEUs and specialty courses I've taken. Keep you knowledge and skills fresh even in a classroom. GOOD Luck to you.

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    megrk2004

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I am a new graduate nurse, and Im having a hard time finding a postion that isnt in a nursing home, how do you get recruiter to give you an interview. Im from a small town and just moved to a bigger city, I currently and working nights at a nursing home and although I love the people I take care of I would like to be able to spend more nights at more with my family . I understand that new graduates from this area have an advantage over me because alot have trained in those hospitals, and I would love to do home health nursing but most agencies want you to have a years experience, any advice ???????

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    punkins98

    about 5 years ago

    2 comments

    What about a National Registered Certified Medical Assistant. What do we stand for?

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    LaurieJT

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    I have been a research coordinator, research monitor and a project manager and not made $95,000 per year. Where is that job located? Where do I apply???

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    lovingmike

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I was just commenting to my fiancee about the different specialties in nursing this morning and was trying to figure out what my specialty is going to be once I finish my RN. Thanks for the article.

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