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Top 10 Highest Paying Nursing Specialties

Top 10 Highest Paying Nursing Specialties

NursingLink

After nurses finish nursing school, choosing the right nursing specialty becomes their chief focus. With so many specialties to choose from, many prospective nurses find it difficult to just pick one, but with nearly every specialty requiring candidates to pass a series of exams and fulfill a period of on-the-job training, time is of the essence!

Pay should not be your only considering when deciding on a specialty, but the list below of the highest paying nursing specialties provides a good primer on which types of nurses have the greatest earning potential.

1) Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist – $135,000

2) Nurse Researcher – $95,000

3) Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner – $95,000

4) Certified Nurse Midwife – $84,000

5) Pediatric Endocrinology Nurse – $81,000

6) Orthopedic Nurse – $81,000

7) Nurse Practitioner – $78,000

8) Clinical Nurse Specialist – $76,000

9) Gerontological Nurse Practitioner – $75,000

10) Neonatal Nurse – $74,000



First Specialty: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist >>


Chamberlain offers online degrees for its RN to BSN program that are convenient and practical.

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    FydawgRN

    almost 5 years ago

    36 comments

    Megrk2004: Even if the job description says, "1-2 years experience required," go ahead and apply for it anyway. 1) If no one else applies for that position with experience, Human Resources is sometimes under pressure to fill it and will hire you anyway. 2) When not if asked the question, "What do you have to offer as a new grad?" You bring a completely open mind to that facilities procedures.

  • Nurse_002_max50

    sunshinenursing

    almost 5 years ago

    4 comments

    Megrk2004, I suggest you take a nursing home position that is still considered experience. You doctor you resume up after that, get the steady income coming in. Take some specialty courses, I guarantee you will be where you want to be soon. I'm an LVN and I get RN salary because of CEUs and specialty courses I've taken. Keep you knowledge and skills fresh even in a classroom. GOOD Luck to you.

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    megrk2004

    almost 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am a new graduate nurse, and Im having a hard time finding a postion that isnt in a nursing home, how do you get recruiter to give you an interview. Im from a small town and just moved to a bigger city, I currently and working nights at a nursing home and although I love the people I take care of I would like to be able to spend more nights at more with my family . I understand that new graduates from this area have an advantage over me because alot have trained in those hospitals, and I would love to do home health nursing but most agencies want you to have a years experience, any advice ???????

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    punkins98

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    What about a National Registered Certified Medical Assistant. What do we stand for?

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    LaurieJT

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    I have been a research coordinator, research monitor and a project manager and not made $95,000 per year. Where is that job located? Where do I apply???

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    lovingmike

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I was just commenting to my fiancee about the different specialties in nursing this morning and was trying to figure out what my specialty is going to be once I finish my RN. Thanks for the article.

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    N1K2R3

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am the daughter, the mother and the niece of all great nurses, each with her own specialty. I just want to say congratulations to all of you who want to embark on such a career. As an observer of the profession, keep one thing in mind, all of you......look at your patient! Do not keep your eyes on the chart. Assess what's going on! Consider all factors! Be diagnostic and well as just fulfilling orders from the physician. Give it your best guess. Be there for the patient! Make rounds when you don't have to. Do not just hang out at the station and look at charts. Get out from behind that desk! Ask questions! Observe the patient when no one is around! Be vigilant!
    Good Luck! Have a great rewarding career.

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    Darlene_Thornsbury2

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    Nursing is a great career choice. I have been in the nursing field since 1988. I started as a LVN and immediately into Associate RN program. Have worked in many and varied capacities. I now have my BSN. What has been an amazing journey is the versatility and ability of applying an Associate Degree to the many positions. With an Associate degree, 2 year program I have worked in positions all the way up to Acting Administrator of a 150 bed Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation facility. I have also worked as Assistant Administrator for a hospital. The choices are many. The work is there if you want to work hard and make the best of the opportunities available. Experience is key in obtaining the best positions. Work ethics and diligence pay off.

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    robschi

    over 5 years ago

    144 comments

    Hi, I just wanted to add another higher paying nurse specialty that some nurses may want to consider. That is working as a Director of Nursing for a Skilled Care or Sub Acute Facility. You can easily earn a starting salary of $75,000 to upwards of $120,000.00, This is usually accompanied by free or very low cost Medical Insurance and bonuses on top of that. You have to be very organized, motivated, be able to delegate, have a high tolerance for stress (AND a way to defuse that at the end of the day to prevent burn-out which is common in this type of job), be very customer service oriented, have the ability to muti-, multi-task (lol)! You also have to have the ability to teach, lead and bring large amounts of diverse people together to accomplish common goals.
    One of the best things about having this type of position is your ability to enact change to produce some rather great outcomes for your patients, the facility and certainly not last, your employees.
    It has been my rather great priveledge to have this position several times in my nursing career (and with only an Associates Degree). I have seen people that other medical institutions say were going to die or be forever in need of constant nursing care, get better, leave to their homes and THEN return to volunteer their time. I have seen soooo many nurses that continued with their education or who have taken my offer of a promotion to a department head or manager take the leap and really make positive, fundamental changes in the facilities that I have worked. I have seen, CNA's become nurse, kitchen workers, 1rst get their CNA certificate, then go on and get their nursing degree. I have even seen housekeepers and maintainence men do the same.
    It is totally invigorating for me to watch their educational growth and watch as they overcome their fears and work for and achieve such goals. All of this has occured when the facility as a whole, becomes invested in the employees (yes, even the patients and their families rooting them on to encourage them to acheive their aspirations!)
    As a Director of Nursing, you have to be a strong advocate for your patients, your employees (even at times, those in different departments), your facility and finally your organization. It's sad, but you also have to (at times) become a strong advocate for your profession. There are those in the public that still view nurses as 'the doctors handmaiden'. When you respond to this, or allegations that "That stupid (or lazy) nurse did this to my family member", you must stand in and stand up to that family member in such a way that is non-confrontational, but leave that family member better educated on the patients' disease as well on the nursing profession and the nursing professionals' abilities, eduaction, as well as the limitations set forth by state and federal law. When this is done correctly, you will not only been an advocate for that nurse, but for the nursing professtion, your facility, the corporation/owner of that facility, the patient,but they will very often havea changed, educated mindset and be a true partner in the care of that patient but also, in all of their experiences with health care professionals in the future.
    I love being a Director of Nursing. It is an exciting, vibrant, ever changing profession to practice!

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    Mr_Green

    over 5 years ago

    12 comments

    This article is extremely helpful

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Res

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    *Hello, I am interested & fulfilling my goals of becoming a Registered Nurse.
    I'd like to go back to finish nursing school.
    I have been out of school for 6yrs now.
    I took most of the requirements for the LVN for the RN program.
    My concern is I have a full time job & I'm a full time mom and
    I would like to know if theirs an online school for nursing that
    I can attend to further my education of becoming a Registered Nurse.
    Could anyone please help me find a school that offers on online
    Nursing School. *Thank You..*

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Euni

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I graduated with a bachelors in biology and psychology pre-medical program. Therefore I have a lot of the science classes already taken. If I want to go into becoming a nurse anesthesiologist, do i have to start from RN to LPN? what's next?

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    jackie30

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    hi am an enrolled community health nurse but currentry doing diploma course in the same. i wanted you to give me advice after i finish my diploma in july this year i dont what to do what do you think is better speacilizing or doing my bsn

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    Emmatol

    almost 6 years ago

    186 comments

    Well, what about critical care nursing, how well paid is it?
    I need to know because that's my area of specialty and i'm still planning of working in Carlifonia later.

  • Misc

    PattyMac

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I completed nursing school when I was 46. It is never too late to make changes, NYCgirlfromQNS! Now I am 53 and want to move into a specialty nursing field but I am unsure how to accomplish this. I have not been able to find courses that focus on Neonatal, Orthopaedic, OR, PACU, etc. Does anyone know if/where courses are available so that one may gain enough knowledge to be seriously considered for a specialty position? I currently work as a home care nurse. Thank you.

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