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Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Nurse?

Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Nurse?

Megan Malugani | Monster Contributing Writer

Although people considering careers in nursing come from all walks of life, many potential nurses share a surprisingly common set of questions and concerns, such as “Can I get into nursing school?” and “Am I crazy to become a nurse at my age?” Two nurses and a nursing professor address wannabe nurses’ frequently asked questions.

How difficult is it to get into nursing school?

It’s pretty tough. In many nursing programs, competition is fierce for a limited number of spots, so students need stellar grades from high school or their first few years of college to earn acceptance into a program. Nursing schools simply don’t have the capacity to accept as many students as are qualified. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing reports that US nursing schools turned away 40,285 qualified applicants in 2007-08 due to a shortage of nursing faculty, a lack of clinical placement sites and budget constraints.

Persistence may be the key for those who are truly passionate about becoming nurses. “A lot of people I know had to [apply] more than once,” says Karen Burnett, RN, a labor and delivery nurse at Methodist Dallas Medical Center. Some of Burnett’s friends even repeated courses to improve their grades.

Although people considering careers in nursing come from all walks of life, many potential nurses share a surprisingly common set of questions and concerns, such as “Can I get into nursing school?” and “Am I crazy to become a nurse at my age?” Two nurses and a nursing professor address wannabe nurses’ frequently asked questions.

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    lstevenson

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Hi, I just finish the PCT course and 6 months prior to that I finish the CNA course, I will be 49 years old this summer and I am looking forward to becoming a full fledge RN. Even though I am not as quite young as the youngus are my heart and passion is to help those. During my course I find that PCT is almost similar to being a LPN in my training I was taught how to start an IV line,Phblem. and reading EKG. AS my quest for knowledge increased the urging and desire grew. I read alot of you all comments and I am truly bless to able to learn from each and every one experience have a bless day

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    MissingNursing

    over 5 years ago

    18 comments

    Amen! I left a busy career in Medical Clinic Administration and graduated from nursing school at age 46! I was top of my class as well! Most of the patients in my area are more mature and as a "mature" nurse I can find things to talk about to open these patients up and talk about their family, when they are appearing sad, or when I see an old photo of the patient in uniform, I can share "war stories" about my son in Iraq. Old veterans love to swap stories! I have gotten many letters that were sent thru the Nursing staff office thanking me for being "Extra Special" just because I found a common bond with a patient or family and took the time to spend time, when the patient acquited this to being a "better nurse". I call it being a Caring Nurse! isn't this why we all joined this profession in the first place?

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    MasseyA

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    I sometimes feel that I am too meek and quiet when it comes to clinical rotations. Many of the instructors have asked me if this is really the profession that I would like to pursue and I feel like they are trying to tell me that I don't belong here. I want to be a nurse. I really want this, but I feel like every door is being slammed in my face.

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    Jenny65

    over 5 years ago

    48 comments

    To do my best in everthing.

  • Keaauntsharon_max50

    sheyan30

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    Sometimes I feel that I am too old to remember when it comes to the knowledge that is provided for me in the books. My goal in the nursing field is to work in the psyc unit and it could be in the nursing home or in a hospital. I am not certain as to where I want to have my job but I really liked the fact that this article addresses the fact about being too old to do this work. Sometimes the older ones tend to be a great nurse in a different way than a younger one. The aspects of thier goals are much different then the younger ones because they feel they need to prove themselves and by doing that they have gone beyond the requirements and shown a better sense of ethics.

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    damcrews

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    Alio and anyone else that wants to become a nurse:there are schools out there. I promise. As stated before, I became an LPN in 1984. I worked like an RN in our hospital in L&D, except for the pay. I researched several avenues and tried several of them: Rue/Moore?New York Regents before I finally found (Deaconess College of Nursing) now called Chamberlain Collefe of Nursing. It is is an online program. I worked 12 hour nights and took classes on-line. You can work any shift because it so flexible.
    I became an RN in 2007 @ 49. So....how bad do you want it?????? Good luck and if I can help, please e-mail @damcrews@gmail.com

  • Kennydonnakaleb_max50

    damcrews

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    I became an LPN in 1984 and I heard that then. I do not think they will disappear. LPN's are the backbone of any organization. I do encourage you to continue with your education after you finish obtaining your LPN. Work as an LPN while you eventually do this. It will help you understand and excile in the RN program. Good luck in whatever you do!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Rock1_max50

    rock83coo

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    wow, there's all this talk about LPN's disappearing within a few years how true is that? I start LPN classes next month and of course the advisors won't tell me that. Does anyone have any advice?

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    Humhoney2006

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    Nursing is good at any age. Just be sure to find a position that is right for your level of physical energy.

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    texasbrat

    over 5 years ago

    12 comments

    Hello. I have been an LVN since 2004. I am 53 now and currently working online and attending class for my RN pre-reqs. At times, I wonder if I'm too old, but I keep telling myself, BULL! I'm just as spry and full of ump! as the younger ones. You're never too old to get an education. If there is a shortage of nurses, it's at the hospitals because the opportunities are numerous for nurses besides bedside. I have a suggestion for the hospitals: if you want nurses, provide better benefits, more pay, and less ratio of patients to nurse. We're only human - not robots! I had an experience recently at a facility (not a nursing home) where the ratio was 1:10 then 1:14 and now it's 1:25. I said goodbye! I asked the facility, where is the quality of care these patients deserve? Nurses are stressed and stretched to the max and that's why alot of nurses get out of the profession all together. Nursing is a wonderful profession and I have been in the medical field since the mid 70's as a CNA, Ward Clerk, Surg Tech, and Cardiac Monitor Tech. I loved them all. But i didn't attend nursing school til later. Much later. You can do it. You can also work anywhere you want. Age is not a stumbling block - you just have to find your area of interest and niche in nursing. Go for it!

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    TheSingingNurse

    over 5 years ago

    32 comments

    .....and I will be 49 when I graduate...hopefully I will be a Certified Nurse Midwife by the time I reach 55....it's never too late to pursue your passion!

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    TheSingingNurse

    over 5 years ago

    32 comments

    Alio - I'm in my 4th semester of nursing school - I have had to work also - I took some of my prereqs at night and online, but once I got into the nursing courses, I had to work nights so I could go to school during the day....try a hospital as a unit secretary or tech if they will train you....that's a great job to get exposure to the medical field....as they say...where there's a will, there's a way - Good Luck!

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    Alio

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am going to be a nurse. Like leswooley I want to be an OBGYN nurse. My major diffuculty is finding a school that give night classes. It's just me so I have to work and take classes at night. I'm stumped but know I'll find a way. I'd appreciate some suggestions though. :) Thanks.

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    caribbeangyrl

    over 5 years ago

    34 comments

    If you put your mind to it, you will succeed. So for all those who wants to become a nurse, just do it.

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    realnursegirl

    over 5 years ago

    16 comments

    I graduated with an ADN 20 years after I graduated high school. I was a single mother raising three boys. It was the hardest and most rewarding thing I have ever done.

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