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Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Nurse?

Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Nurse?

Megan Malugani | Monster Contributing Writer

Do I need to be a whiz at math and science?

Although basic math and science aptitudes are necessary, you won’t flunk out if you don’t have the periodic table memorized or if you use a calculator when performing long division. “You don’t need to be a calculus genius by any means,” Burnett says. “You do need to be a well-rounded student.”

Although people considering careers in nursing come from all walks of life, many potential nurses share a surprisingly common set of questions and concerns, such as “Can I get into nursing school?” and “Am I crazy to become a nurse at my age?” Two nurses and a nursing professor address wannabe nurses’ frequently asked questions.

Would You Pass the Math Section of the NCLEX?

1. For what value of x is 2(x+10) = 4(x-2)

14
10
2
-4

What if I can’t pass the NCLEX?

Don’t let a fear of failing the NCLEX-RN licensing exam deter you from becoming a nurse. “Don’t decide against nursing because you think you’re not the best test taker,” says Janet Krejci, PhD, RN, an associate professor of nursing at Marquette University College of Nursing. Before enrolling in a particular nursing school, ask about that program’s NCLEX pass rate. Marquette’s pass rate is usually 90 percent or higher, Krejci says. Many nursing schools offer intensive NCLEX review courses and similar programs to support students who have difficulty taking tests.

Although people considering careers in nursing come from all walks of life, many potential nurses share a surprisingly common set of questions and concerns, such as “Can I get into nursing school?” and “Am I crazy to become a nurse at my age?” Two nurses and a nursing professor address wannabe nurses’ frequently asked questions.

Am I too old?

Nursing schools graduate nurses of all ages. “I would never tell someone that they’re too old to become a nurse,” says Krejci, who knows of a nurse who started in the profession after a 25-year business career. Age can even be an advantage. “Life experience only enhances a nurse’s ability to be as supportive as they can to their patients,” Krejci says. Adds Burnett: “You need to be energetic, enthusiastic, flexible and have a passion for learning, and those characteristics certainly do not apply to any particular age group.”

Although people considering careers in nursing come from all walks of life, many potential nurses share a surprisingly common set of questions and concerns, such as “Can I get into nursing school?” and “Am I crazy to become a nurse at my age?” Two nurses and a nursing professor address wannabe nurses’ frequently asked questions.

Next: Strong Enough? >>


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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    cjeank

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    Hello, SLewis, I am also a nursing Student at 32 with children, single mom, I took most of my prerequisites for the nursing program at a community college and the Pell Grant funded all of them. I just transferred to a university because I plan on getting my bachelor's and doctorate so I can be one of the nursing instructors...i love nursing and I love teaching too...i found after transferring to the university, that there are more grants and scholarships avaiable at the university level, tuition is higher, but it ends up evening out....check your state scholarship programs, there are specific "Nursing Scholarships" in most if not all states....because you already have a Bachelor's Degree, you are eligible for an Accelerated degree program at the community college an university level, check into what is offered at the schools in your area. Bravo! for getting your CNA, you will learn sooo much working under nurses! I have been a cna at a nursing home and have now been at a local hospital for almost 5 years while going to school for the past few years....GOOD LUCK!!!!

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    nannurse

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I would like to comment about the comment made regarding working hours "from 7am until midnight". I have been a nurse for over 20 years and have yet to work that kind of slave shift. Nursing is no different than other careers and do have regular hours just like any other job. Any employer that would require a nurse to work from 7am to midnight would find themselves soon out of nurses!

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    casassy62688

    almost 6 years ago

    290 comments

    Good article.....and this makes me want to become a nurse even more! I know what I'm getting myself into and I know that I am very lucky to get to work side by side everynight at work to help others.....it's very rewarding for me!

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    Account Removed

    almost 6 years ago

    Although nursing programs are full, there are more nurses leaving the career than joining. The reasons are many, but I think it is because nursing is so hard. I LOVE LOVE LOVE it, but I only have me to take care of. Nurses have to sacrifice so much for the privlege of being a nurse. You go in to work at 7a, you might not get home until midnight. You probably won't get a lunch break, or even a pee break. The responsibilty is nothing less than another human being's life. You do it for your own reasons, but it does wear on you. This is not whining, this is just reality.

  • Nursehellokitty_max50

    Nurse2Be_2009

    almost 6 years ago

    8 comments

    thanks for sharing!

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    Lindadee427

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    mikkidane-53 is definitely not too old. In my program there are woman older than that.

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    natasharw

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    JuddPaynter, to answer your question, there's also a shortage of Nursing Professors, that's why the nursing programs can accept so little people at a time.

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    mikkidane

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    i am 53 is that to old?

  • Bogey_max50

    vwoods

    almost 6 years ago

    130 comments

    I love this article. It makes me more proud to be a nursing student.

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    JuddPaynter

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I am curious to know, if there is such a shortage of nurses, why is there such long waiting lists of people who want to enroll in nursing, but there is no room? I live in Central Oregon, and I know there is a waiting list of students wanting to get in, but can't due to no enough space. You don't suppose it's because teaching nurses are not paid as well as nurses in other medical professions, so they leave teaching to pursue better paying jobs?

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    Lindadee427

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    I became a nursing student this year and this was my third time applying to a nursing program. I would talk to whoever does the enrolling for the school that you want to go to and ask them what you need to do to be accepted. They are the ones in the "know". Do whatever they tell you and keep checking in with them. Be persistent and don't give up. Find a school you like and concentrate your efforts there. Take your pre-req's first while wating and get good grades. Especially in the maths and sciences. Take some electives that you will be useful to you when you do get into the field. They want to see students that are totally committed to studying and the program. They want to ensure that you are going to finish and be successful and a well rounded nurse. While I was waiting some electives that I took were a statistics class, a disaster relief class, a class on death and dying and a spanish for health professionals. The main point is to start somewhere whether it be in an Associate degree program or a Bachelor degree program. Doesn't matter which because it's the same exam and you are still an RN whether you go 2 or 4 years. Community colleges are a great resource and usually have excellent nursing programs. It's a smaller student body and the professors get to know their students. I love my school. So good luck and don't give up! By the way, I am 50 so it doesn't matter how old you are.

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    SLewis

    almost 6 years ago

    6 comments

    I'm 31 years old and have a non-medical bachelors degree. After staying at home for 5 years with my 3 young children I recently started working part time at night as a CNA in a nursing home. I love it so much that I'm considering going back to school for my RN. I would need to take a few prerequisites before I could start nursing school, but I am hopeful that in the next 2-3 years that I will be able to devote the time and energy need to make the career change. Until them I'm trying to collect all the advise and information I can on what programs are available and how I can fund nursing school.

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    DCW

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    what is the first step i need to take to become apart of the nursing field? i have tried all different steps online and have gotten no where what step should i take first? i was on the na registry for 2 years and and didn't get any further i've always wanted to become a RN but i need help.

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    sandramae40

    almost 6 years ago

    8 comments

    Most schools are going to RN's as the Nursing community is trying to get ride of LPN's, I don't think it will haoppen but the best place to work for LPN's is nursing homes. I have been an LPN since 2001 and just finished my BSN this past July and took my NCLEX today and I am almost 40 so no you are never to old and don't let the waiting lists scare you we need Nurses and we need ones that are willing to get there Master's and teach the new nurses that is why the waits are so long we do not have enough MSN's to teach the BSN programs. I find my job very rewarding and am glad I went back to school and became a nurse it took me 8 years to finish my BSN but I am done with it and make faily good money now. Just hang in there and look around sometimes you can find a Vo-Tech to get your LPN in less then a year and then work as a nurse while you finish up your RN that is how I did it.

  • Dogwood_avatar_max50

    dogwood

    almost 6 years ago

    6 comments

    Zee - No you are not too old, I'm 44 and just finishing all my pre-req's for nursing school. You need to investigate nursing programs in your area to see what the requirements are and if the school is the right fit for you. You have the option of a 2 year RN programs through some community colleges or a BSN which is a 4 year nursing degree. Which you choose is dependent on you. Hope that Helps.

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