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10 Qualities of a Great Nurse Educator

Kayla Baxter | NursingLink

Looking for a career change?
Health care is one of the fastest growing professions out there, but every day, prospective students are being turned away because of a lesser-known shortage: there aren’t enough Nurse Educators to teach them all!

As a nurse, you are already ahead of the curve if you’re interested in becoming a Nurse Educator. After all, you already know most of the material. Becoming a nursing instructor is also a great way to change careers into something with more flexible hours, less physical strain, and better pay.

Sounds good, doesn’t it? Read on for the 10 qualities that you’ll need if you want to survive and thrive as a Nurse Educator.

#10: Patience →


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    scifisharon

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I am an RN for 18 years now. I also, like "createsjg", do not have a degree. I don't have as many years experience as her though. I went to what was once considered the best Nursing School in the country. It was also the oldest ( think there may have been one other that was as old or older), St. Vincent's Hospital Nursing School in New York. My class was the 100 year graduating class in 1992. The school was absorbed into the College of Mt. St. Vincent so it could be a BSN program. It was only a diploma program. I can tell you that the education, especially the clinical program, was the best you could find, even then. Students from degree programs around NY did their clinical on our units and we couldn't believe the lack of knowledge they had by that point in their education. If you really want good Nursing Educators, take a look at Nurses like us who have no chance to be Educators because of the way the degree system works. By the way, when I attempted to go back to get my BSN, 2 times by the way. I thought the courses were horrible and a waste of time. It almost seems like they are just trying to find things to put into courses to make up a degree program. The online BSN programs are really awful. They are supposed to be for working adults. It seems to me that they have gone out of their way to find things to make it difficult so it doesn't look like it's too easy. I was really disappointed in all the degree programs I encountered. By the way, I had 3 yrs as a Biology major at Hunter College in NY before I went to St. Vincent's and I had a 3.8 GPA. I'm no slouch as a student. I am going back to school now for a Masters in Oriental Medicine and saying goodbye to Nursing. It's a dead end for me now after all the years I have dedicated to it I have no where to go. It's a real shame. As far as a shortage goes, I don't see that either. There are not that many jobs around here in Phoenix, AZ. The biggest problem is that you have lots of nurses without specialized experience but no one is willing to train a nurse in a new area any more. If you don't have current experience in the exact area they want they will not train you for a new area. You can't break into a new area of Nursing any more. They won't even acknowledge skills you have that you may not have used for a while and give you a chance and train you to bring you back up to speed. The whole thing is a mess. Nursing Educator? When anyone asks me, I advise to become a Physician Assistant, not a Nurse.

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    KristieRN95

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    Make these positions full-time with benefits and do not require a PhD. Or require that you have to publish either. Might have more interest. I always found that unless my nursing instructor also worked a few shifts a month in that area that they are teaching, they often were out of touch with current practice. This is also another area of concern.

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    joanetonn54

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    We nurses must unifyably (not in the union mentality) work toward practice changes. Primary nursing is no longer providing positive patient outcomes. Acuity, mandates, and pt. demands clouded by a litigious attitude prevent one nurse/6 patient climate. Team nursing must be looked at seriously. We cannot survive in the current 1980 model.

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    rebecca7777_blue

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been a RN for 28 years, I am 4 semesters from becoming a nurse practioner. At the age of 40 I went back to school to get my BSN. I live in a rural area of southwest Virginia. There is no shortage of nurses here. There is a tricollege nursing program which, & this is only an estimate, graduates aprrox 125-150+/- yearly into an area that has small hospitals. This is not what i would consider a shortage of nurses at all. Now I just read a comment from below from a nurse " sfkuefler." I am thinking of attending the nurse practioner program in fall 2010. But after reading her comment, it once agains become discouraging because I wanted to be a nurse educator, not part-time, but full-time. She has done this for 10yr & remains adjunct faculty. So how is one to complete their dreams & goals. I feel like after 28 yrs I have a lot to offer new young nurses. I would love to teach & to share my nursing life experiences to those entering the nursing field. So, now if I start the FNP program in fall2010, I will always wonder if it will be worth 2 more yrs of education only to find the local field saturated with FNP's. that would make my nursing education having spent 7 yrs in college. I could have been many other professionals by then. Thanks for letting me vent.

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    WiseOldOwl

    over 4 years ago

    78 comments

    So do I. (Wish that I could teach) But I am at least 5 months from finishing a BSN and owe $$$ in student loans and do not quite feel up to taking on MORE debt with the economy in its present state to pursue a Masters' degree. I think it is very odd that no one seemed to connect that the current nursing shortage would ALSO mean that the faculty would be reaching retirement age. Does no one add 2 + 2 anymore?

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    metot

    over 4 years ago

    2308 comments

    well said...

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    createsjg

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been a nurse for 40 years and have all of the qualifications to teach others to be nurses but I don't have a degree. Some will remember when older nurses taught the young to be nurses. There are people that are capable like myself that are not "qualified" and our experience is wasted. I love to teach and would prefer being in the clinical area--not didactic. I want to see our young nurses succeed. Wish I could help. createsjg@yahoo.com

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    Andrijana

    over 4 years ago

    16 comments

    I was nursing student (older one) and was prone to observe behavior of people and happenings around me. At our school, behind the scene, we had merciless fight among the teachers, for teaching positions. Finally, one of the best instructors was shoot out, never to come back, after endless evaluations. She wanted to teach but she was prevented from our own kind. There comes a lot of personal issues at the play. I just don't believe in real shortage anymore. And, at this school, waiting time for some students was 2 years or more, with all those prerquisites and the rest. I already had my first degree and those requested credits so, I got spared of waiting. Where that lost instructor went? Back to clinic and hospital where she worked before, full of disapointment with her try to be a teacher. And, she is just one of many like her.

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    burnsmullett

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I loved this article especially the pictures! Cheryl B. CRNA

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    captnpatchemup

    over 4 years ago

    54 comments

    This is great. It's nice to see a positive story on here!

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    sfkuefler

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    I agree with all of these qualities. I have been a nurse educator for approximately ten years as adjunct faculty. The one quality that I find most important and must frustrating to keep is patience. I have been looking for a full-time faculty position for over 6 years and they are impossible to find. None of the universities and colleges are willing to pay for the expertise they are getting. Benefits are not available, therefore forcing those of us who need benefits to work two jobs at once. This then affects both our jobs and our personal lives, because working two jobs is too much!!!! I wish someone would start pressuring the colleges and universities to stop screaming about a nursing educator shortage and start hiring all of us who wish to teach full time and offer us benefits.

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