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Is Your Relationship Hurting Your Career?

Is Your Relationship Hurting Your Career?

Christina Macres | NursingLink

August 10, 2010

No one ever said nursing was easy. Throw a relationship into the mix and you’ve got career suicide, right? Wrong. While we’d all love to forgo a night shift in exchange for a fun-filled day with our significant other, having a strong relationship doesn’t mean your occupational goals have to suffer. It’s quite the opposite! Extensive research on the subject of relationships and careers shows that people in successful relationships not only make more money, they’re healthier, live longer, and get more promotions than singles do. So how can you juggle your relationship and your nursing career?

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We’ve got the five tips that’ll keep your work and love life harmonious — and YOU sane!

#1 Prioritize.

It’s a fact: Sometimes life forces us to put more weight on one thing than another. Often, this priority shift means forgoing one goal in exchange for another; for example, weakening your professional aspirations in return for relationship growth. But you shouldn’t have to sacrifice one aspect of your life for another. After all, what’s the fun of a promotion if you don’t have someone to share it with?

The good news is prioritizing doesn’t mean sacrifice. It means adjustment. And by building a strong foundation for both your romantic and nursing life, you can prevent disruption when priorities shift.

Step one: Make sure that both your significant other and your coworkers know that they’re a significant part of your life. When both understand that they are mutually valuable, staying late at the hospital doesn’t mean that you’d rather be at work, nor does taking a personal day mean you don’t care about your patients.

Communicate that both are of high priority and sometimes, as need be, one might take precedence.

Next: Compartmentalize >>


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  • Tinkerbell_oopps

    Tinkerbell09

    over 3 years ago

    16 comments

    It's hard to know how to balance job and relationship. I work almost seven days a week and full time, somethimes I do overtime. So when I have a day off or get out earlier all I just want to do is to relax and take a break for me. That's when relationship problems comes, I wont have any energy and have quality time to spend with him.

  • Chlopaya_nurse_max50

    SF_NurseLady

    over 3 years ago

    16 comments

    I work such long hours and my husband is an attorney -- we have so little time to spend together. It's NOT easy. No kids though and neither of us has any real hobbies, so our time off IS quality time together.

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