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Common Nursing Phrases You're Tired of

Common Nursing Phrases You're Tired of

What are you tired of hearing?

Hamsa Ramesha | NursingLink

July 27, 2010

You’ve heard them before: patient complaints, whining doctors, and every excuse in the book. You joke about them with fellow nurses, recount them with your friends and significant others, and roll your eyes as you hear the same phrase for the millionth time.

Nursing is a crazy profession in which no one shift is quite like any other. But through it all there are common patient requests, excuses, and nursing phrases that never change. Unfortunately, these overused phrases aren’t going away anytime soon, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make fun of them.

Check out these common nursing phrases that are never going out of fashion, no matter how corny, cheesy, or tacky they are.

The Nursing Interview Quiz

1. It's interview time! You arrive at your interview:

30 minutes early - you want to show your dedication to the job.
10 minutes early - But you were actually parked and ready to go in 20 minutes ago.
5 minutes late - You don't want to seem too eager.

1. “How May I Help You?”

Makes you feel like a waiter, right? Tell us about it. As in retail, in the hospital the patient comes first. Your first responsibility as a nurse is to make sure the patient’s needs are taken care of, and that you are acting as their advocate. As tiresome as this phrase is, it’s most likely one of the first things you ask a patient and/or his family — every single time you meet a new patient. And when you have several patients, that means you’ll be fielding family requests, updating multiple charts, and monitoring many different cases. It all comes with the territory.

2. “Because Your Doctor Said So.”

But unlike in the world of customer service, the patient is not always right. Unfortunately, that’s not always clear to some people. While you should have your patients’ interests in mind, it’s the doctor that makes the final call on how they are treated — not their concerned wife or something they read on WebMD. Stand firm and stick with those great nursing instincts. The patient doesn’t always know what’s best for them — that’s up to you and the doctor. You’ve got the power!

3. “I Swear, if That Patient Rings the Call Bell One More Time…”

Some patients will do anything just to get a nurse’s complete attention — right? And, unfortunately, it’s your duty to answer that annoying ring each time, because you never know when it will be a real emergency. Whoever invented the call bell obviously never knew the ways that power would be abused. We know it’s hard sometimes, but be patient with your patients. Hopefully there’s no Dr. House at your hospital paging the nurses for no reason.

Next: Common Nursing Phrase #4 >>


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  • Jj_on_rock_wall_max50

    vwarren

    almost 4 years ago

    4 comments

    I agree with pecanpeach. I have been nursing for twelve years and I have never said this won't hurt a bit. Usually I tell patients to brace themselves, this IV i'm inserting is going to feel like a nail being driven up their arms. That way, when it is not as bad as I made it out to be, they are pleasantly suprised. One phrase I can't stand is when a patient calls for pain medication. Upon drawing it (and they do specify which one they want) and you are able to be sitting up, laughing, texting, surfing the web, walking around the room. And when asked to rate their pain on a scale of one to ten, they state 9 or 10 (ten being the worst pain imaginable). When asked to describe their pain (location, severity), the answer is "you know, it's just kind of all over". Not in my dictionary! I once had a patient stand at his door bouncing his cane up and down on the floor screaming "where is my nurse, I need my @*&% pain shot now!" At the same time, he saw every nurse on the floor running into one room with the crash cart because a patient was coding. I know this is not unique to just our floor. From what I have read lately, there seems to be an increase in patients that are drug seeking. My philosphy on that subject is that if your doctor orders it and you say you are in pain, I will deliver said medication. But good grief, if you see a world of chaos going on outside your door, please be patient.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    pecanpeach

    almost 4 years ago

    4 comments

    “This Won’t Hurt a Bit.” OR “You Won’t Feel a Thing.”

    "we KNOW you’ve said this more than once to reassure a wary patient"

    WRONG. I hate it when assumptions are made, I can tell you that in 14 years in healthcare (5 as a CNA first, and 9 now as an RN), I have NEVER said this to a patient, since it generally is a bald-faced lie (since things that won't hurt don't need that said). I'm guessing I'm not the only one who's never said it.

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