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Recession-Proof Job? Try Nursing

Recession-Proof Job? Try Nursing

Marcia Heroux Pounds / McClatchy-Tribune

December 21, 2008

Ever thought of becoming a pharmacist? Or an economist? How about a veterinarian?

These are some of the highest paying recession-proof jobs, according to Laurence Shatkin, author of “150 Best Recession- Proof Jobs,” a new book by JIST Publishing.

“Each recession is a little different than the one before in terms of sectors of the economy. The technology bubble in 2001 affected a lot of technology jobs. But construction was going well,” he says. “This time, the tech jobs are doing fairly well.”

What’s not on the list? Notably absent are jobs in real estate, construction, banking and finance.

The book is most useful for people making long-term career plans, young people or those making a mid-career changes, the author says. Some jobs take a larger investment of time and money to pursue than others.

Industries with the highest concentration of recession-proof positions are transit and ground passenger transportation, hospitals and ambulatory care services.

The best recession-proof job is computer systems analyst, an occupation that typically earns nearly $70,000 a year. New positions in that field are growing 29 percent a year. Other fastest-growing jobs are network systems and data communications analysts, veterinary technologists and medical assistants.

People seek certain jobs for reasons that go beyond their interests or talents, the author says. “Income, leadership, independence, lifestyle and security matters to some people,” Shatkin says.

If you’re looking at pay, the national average earnings for a pharmacist is more than $94,000 a year. Economists make an average of $77,000 and veterinarians about $72,000, according to the book, which uses U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

Barry Brown, president of Effective Resources, a Knoxville, Tenn., firm that tracks salary information, says if he was giving advice to a student or someone changing careers, it would be to pursue a medical-related job.

“If you’re a nurse, you’ll have a job for life in any country. The shortage of nurses is not going away,” he says.

© YellowBrix Inc.


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  • Dsc00049_max50

    hahaman

    almost 3 years ago

    12 comments

    Since the recession began I heard many young people, my age most of them, complaining that there are no available jobs for them. At first, I was a bit discouraged as I was one of those people looking for one. But, my conclusion after about 2 months is that most people are too lazy to find a good job. I went to an interview and the employer told em I was right for the job, but I needed to get a criminal justice diploma. So, I went home and got my online masters degree in criminal justice, and so I got a very good job! There are many other job opportunities like this just as long as you are willing to work a bit. My opinion is that if people were to try and work more, the job problem would just vanish!

  • Hpim1160_max50

    Evansgrammy

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    I live in a small town nursing jobs are hard to come by and i cant move...i do agency work but am lucky to get 1 day a week, so to me its very frustrating when i keep hearing that theres such a shortage of nurses :( btw im an LPN for 25 plus years and yes when i apply i do tell them im willing to work any shift ...but still very limited hours....

  • Rn_max50

    AbusyRN2go

    over 5 years ago

    13876 comments

    true very true

  • Mickeymouseclubhouse_240_max50

    kstiltner1

    over 5 years ago

    7170 comments

    Interesting. health care is always in need.

  • Shutterstock_12751099_max50

    RiannaP

    over 5 years ago

    48 comments

    Need proof? Kaiser Permanente who has 36 hospitals across the county has 16,000 - 18,000 positions open up per year. That number isn't expected to decline in 2009 .

    "Health care and education are two industries where hiring is fairly steady, no matter the economy, says Brendan Courtney, senior vice president and group executive at Mergis Group, a national staffing firm. "People still keep getting sick, and people still keep going to college," he says. And in some cases, the demand for candidates outstrips the supply."

    Article: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122999321221628707.html?mod=dist_sm...

    Also, check out the book "Healthcare Job Explosion"

  • Hpim0228_max50

    ccburkejm

    over 5 years ago

    148 comments

    This article is right up my street. Having studied and worked in finance, accounting, and management, I can say that the switch to healthcare is worth it (though I am still in school). This industry is a very giving one, while in finance and the others that I have worked, I became mean, selfish, and even greedy before I even realized how much my job afftected my everyday life. I really do prefer to work really hard trying to help someone on their way back to good health than to try to coerce someone to make an investment when there is no way for me to predict what will happen in the market the very next day - regardless of how many degrees I had. Pointless.

  • Demetrice_029

    cuttie

    over 5 years ago

    1042 comments

    I agree with the tech jobs, my neighbor is doing farely well.

  • 12-27-2008_3_01_53_pm_max50

    dereshperez

    over 5 years ago

    10 comments

    If the reason for going into nursing strictly money, you will be miserable. Nursing isn't easy contrary to the publics perception. Most nurses are under compensated for all that they do. Some questions to ask yourself prior to pursuing a career in nursing are, Are you ready for long hours, late lunches, few bathroom breaks and tireless commitment?

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    I don't believe that there is a job that is a recession-proof. Perhaps, nursing is more secure field than any other nowdays. Said so...there are clinics that closed down and nurses have lost their jobs. I see less and less job openings for nurses at different hospitals.

  • Stacy_max50

    caribbeangyrl

    over 5 years ago

    34 comments

    I don't necessarily agree with the story.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    We have more than one member on here who are out of work.

  • Demetrice_029

    cuttie

    over 5 years ago

    1042 comments

    I saw, a tv show, on how middle class citizens are out of work, one in particular was a nurse.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    Nurses are losing jobs all over the country. Hospitals closing. Hiring freezes. Where does this myth come from?

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    apfboxer

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I don't agree with this article. I live in the Twin Cities and nurses are loosing their jobs. Clinics are closing as well. At the facility I work at several Nursing Assistants lost their jobs earlier this year and this coming year administration is thinking about cutting some nurses and replacing them with TMAs. The Health Care industry is not safe from the recession.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    The authors of these articles/books do not work in nursing. I will say it one more time; nursing is not by any means recession proof. you will not have a job for life in any country. Baloney.

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