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Nursing Industry Desperate To Find New Hires

Nursing Industry Desperate To Find New Hires

While other industries are shedding jobs, nursing recruiters are frantically trying to hire new workers to address a nationwide nursing shortage expected to worsen as the population ages. (AP Photo/ Dinesh Ramde )

Dinesh Ramde / AP

January 05, 2009

Some hospital departments where experience is vital, such as the emergency room or intensive-care unit, simply cannot hire newly minted nurses. So managers in those areas have even fewer staffing choices.

Nurses qualified to teach aspiring nurses are scarce chiefly because they can make at least 20 percent more working at a hospital, experts said.

“It can be hard to turn down that extra money,” said Robert Rosseter, the associate executive director of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in Washington, D.C.

Many recruiters have looked for employees overseas, and about one-fourth of the nurses who earned their licenses in 2007 were educated internationally, most in the Philippines and India.

Some health organizations go out of their way to recruit as many nurses as possible even when they’re overstaffed.

Residential Home Health, the home-nursing company in Michigan, is always looking to hire, Curtis said. Even with 375 clinical professionals on staff, his recruiters are eager to sign up as many as 50 more nurses and therapists, hence the Chuck Woolery event.

Zinda, the Milwaukee-area recruiter, said creative recruiting helps to introduce nurses to his hospital. Besides offering interviewees $50 gas cards, he has provided $100 gift cards to the local mall, and created a Facebook page to target younger nurses.

Attracting good candidates is about offering good working conditions, he said, but creative recruiting goes a long way in generating a buzz.

“Bottom line, you need to get people excited about what you’re offering,” he said. “If you don’t, they can easily go elsewhere.”

© YellowBrix Inc.

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    cynccrn

    over 5 years ago

    10 comments

    This conversation is very interesting. I am from a large metropolitan area, and recently we have had 4 hospitals who have laid off employees including nurses who have been with the hospital for two years or less. I am one of those that recently lost their job. I am an MSN educated nurse with over 15 years of experience in critical care. At the time of my lay off (December 9, 2008) I was working as a the nurse clinician for critical care services at a level one trauma center, and I essentially cannot find a job in this area despite having my resume on every recruitment site out there, such as Monster.com, careerbuilders.com, etc. I have however received multiple recruiters contacting me for CNS jobs in other states as far as Hawaii, and Alaska, but my husband cannot relocate. So I may have to relocate alone and leave my husband and children behind.

    Nonetheless my thoughts on this whole issue of a nursing shortage are many. When I was being laid off the CEO of the hospital was taking home a 1.6 million dollar bonus for a hospital that apparently wasn't meeting it's budget, go figure! The CEO wasn't the only one collecting a bonus, all of the directors and managers were collecting bonuses as well. Honestly I have no idea how these people can look themselves in the mirror every day. Bottom line, I don't think we have a shortage of nurses in this country, we have an abundance of CEOs, directors, and managers who have made poor business decisions which clearly demonstrate fiscal negligence. Hell, the CEO I spoke of has no more than a BA and he is running a hospital, OOFTA! Another of the directors has only an AD. So I think the question we need to be asking is; Why are all of these individuals receiving bonuses at the same time their hospitals are loosing money??? I think it is time to consider what patients need, more nurses, and stop giving people in health care bonuses. I mean honestly, giving bonuses to a hospital CEO, I am sorry, but 1.6 million dollars can pay for a lot of nursing, and giving bonuses to people who occupy positions of authority within a hospital system should be outlawed, especially when they are laying off nurses at the same time! So as long as the public continues to put up with this patients are going to suffer. Think about it, if CEOs, directors, and managers are told that they will receive a bonus at the end of the year for saving the hospital money, what do you suppose the likely outcome is going to be??? Doesn't take a rocket scientist to answer that question! I feel sorry for anyone who needs to be hospitalized anymore, as much as we nurses care, I don't think we are miracle workers:-(

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    lexzworld

    over 5 years ago

    14 comments

    After 3yrs (all yr round) the college in my city only offers130 R.N. places - it just went up from 90 & i have ALWAYS keep-up my 4.0 G.P.A U have to know someone or get in with instr. from there in advance. Its horrible! Why doesn't Someone come up with a school for a faster, bigger R.N. to be school!?? Lexi @ lexzworld@cox.net

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    raymoss1

    over 5 years ago

    220 comments

    I have been looking for a full time postion for the past year and find it very difficult. If I am called for an interveiw my time is wasted. I recently was called by a recruiter from a well known nurising home chain. The interveiw was set up. I drove the 30 min drive. Sat waiting for 1 hour for the HR person. Was interveiwed after waiting all that time. This happens all the time. If you are offered the job it is never for the shift or pay promised. This facility that I interveiwed for was so desperate for nurses (Per the recruiter) yet they wasted my time and didn't offer me the job. This is the trend. It was easier finding a job 10 years ago. One would think that a hospital or nursing home would be honored to hire a nurse with experience. Not the case anymore.

  • 1_max50

    mfay

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Wow, wish it was that way around here(in RI) I can't find a nursing job anywhere. I did a RN job search for the state and it came up with 0 jobs. I heard if any nurses leave, they won't rehire anyone.

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    jazzy0154

    over 5 years ago

    10 comments

    why can't alot of the prerecs be on line ?if there is less time in school more people would probably have it easier. and would have alot more time to do the classes at there own pace. they know when it's the best time for them to study and test. just an idea that i would love to see happen

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    Rredds

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    ....and furthermore.....I'll add to my previous comment. They should definitely hire LPNs to care for the patient. LPNs are trained as bedside nurses. As an LPN for over 20 years, my best clinical experience was in school to be an LPN and later working as an LPN. THEN, someone came up with the brilliant idea to eliminate LPNs or as they say, "do away with" LPNS and train techs. EXCUSE ME? If I were a patient and new that a tech with less than three months of on the job training was about to start an IV, put in my foley, or pass my meds, I'd soon be looking for another facility, or none at all. What are we doing people? LPNS are nurses who are on the floors working their butts off, making intelligent decisions under the auspices of an RN. Most recently I found myself pushing a stretcher to the floor while the tech was starting an IV and doing an EKG? I'm an RN now? What the heck is happening here? I feel like I"m in the twilight zone at times.

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    Rredds

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    OK< so now it is my turn to vent. I was told by a very well educated, very experienced RN to do what ever it takes to first make contact with the nurse manager of the unit in which you choose to work. Have you ever visited a hospital to submit your resume. OH NO! You don't have an appointment? You didn't apply online? You didn't follow the yellow brick road to "wait until I get around to it?" It, being calling you back for an appointment that may or may not occur? While the nurses on the floors of these facilites are struggling with unsafe patient to nurse ratios, the HR department is either at job fairs, or out to lunch, or on vacation, or looking for another job? It's true.
    And, once a nurse reaches her 50's, you may just as well pick another profession if you don't have your masters so that you can enter the administration hall of fame. Forget the fact that you have spent the last 30-40 years of your life watching the nursing profession deteriorate beyond belief, but now you have to endure the "dinosaur" category that is bestowed on anyone who has knowledge and experience and a few well earned wrinkles. Nursing has turned into a business. The day the patient became known as a client or a customer was the beginning of the end of the nursing profession that we all know and loved. There will come a day, and I hope I don't live to see it, that there will be two types of personnel working in hospitals. Master's trained RNs who sit, and techs who work.....there will be no nurturing, no warmth, no intense listening to the patient, and definitely no caring. Nursing has become an Airport control tower. Make sure the patient lands, lives, and doesn't crash. Takes off in a timely manner and doesn't cause a commotion that will slow down the process. It's sad but true and it is getting worse. I have been waiting for an interview in a facility that has at the very least 40 available positions. And I was told that because orientation isn't scheduled for another four weeks I will have to wait for an interview.
    Sorry, but I found another position. Yes! I sought out the Nurse Mgr. who was more than happy to push the process past the HR department. After all, why should they care whether the patients have nurses. They work their 8 hours and go home. Maybe one day they will be patients or their families will be patients and things may change. But, I sincerely doubt it. When your hospital depends on people who are as dumb as a box of bricks, the patients will always suffer. There is no nursing shortage, only a shortage of capable people to hire talented nurses.

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    joannhartrn

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am a nurse in (very very northern) California. If you want a job come on out here. California has nursing ratios!!!! So the hospital has to have the appropriate staff or they get a massive fine from the state. You guys need to move out of your comfort zone. My hospital is only a 120 bed hospital and they are giving new hirees. $5000 moving expenses, 10000 sign on bonus, $5000 relocation fee and anything else you can swindle out of them. Starting wages for a new grad are over $27. And as for the cost of living it is pretty close. I used to live in Pittsburgh, PA. I had a house for $120000 and made $16.70 an hour. Now I have a $240000 home and I make $33. And btw I have only been a nurse for 5 years. If you go to San Fran or any huge city. You can start out making $65 an hour.

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    melco75

    over 5 years ago

    70 comments

    Well maybe they'll just have to start hiring us LPN's! :)

  • Luannaboa

    Luanna1Love

    over 5 years ago

    54 comments

    CVSHAW9 I do believe you have hit the proverbial nail on the head in your comments. FLYNN126, I really hate to tell you this, but it is as tough on the other end of the spectrum.
    The nursing shortage is reaching Crisis proportions and to have nurses desperate for work is a very telling indicator that something is VERY MUCH IN NEED OF CORRECTION within the nursing profession.
    Noticably absent from this post so far are nurses who are fit as a fiddle, if overworked, and in the prime of thier lives, struggling to make it all balance out. They are probably working massive overtime somewhere and may or may not get to read about those of us with need for experience, and those of us with experience in need of others to do the literal heavy lifting. Hospitals in NJ will not hire light duty, neither will nursinghomes. I am in nursing for over 2 1/2 decades now and have seen the truth of CVSHAWS words. It is beyond a crying shame and boardering on being criminal that we have loving, caring, experienced nurses sitting on the sidelines for what appears to be the mismanagement of the nursing profession.

    Hospitals and Nursing Homes took a calculated risk in policy making to not hire light duty. They are hoping to reduce workers compensation costs. Its a calculated risk they have to consider, but a blanket policy hurts those individuals who through no real fault of their own are injured and consequentally cannot find work light duty without lying about it. THAT is also a calculated risk, and one I am not sure I am willing to take. If you are found out to be lying or misrepresenting the truth, you can and will be terminated. Additionally, if you are not following your doctors orders and are reinjured, you and you alone are responsibly for all your medical costs.
    Nurses are dedicated individuals and yes, will put others before themselves, but not necessarily at risk to themselves when it can be done another way. The way that nursing had of "eating its young" when I entered nursing has somewhat improved or so I thought.... I tell you that the taste of nursing seems to also run to its older population as well.
    In any case....<<< MAJOR CHANGES IN ATTITUDES AND NURSING MANAGEMENT with STRONG CONSIDERATION OF AVAILABLE AND WILLING( some desperate) NURSES WHO PERHAPS MUST WORK LIGHT DUTY NOW... WOULD DO VERY WELL TO BE CONSIDERED AS A PARTIAL SOLUTION TO AN OVERWHELMING CRISIS IN NURSING SHORTAGE>>> There are wise cultures that respect the older and are patient with and help to cultivate the young. Why can't NURSING be like that as well?? Think of it. Experiencee nursing guiding younger nursing and younger nursing appreciating the wisdom and experience of older nurses... and hospitals that let us ALL WORK at what we do because it is a vocation with us, not a career move. LISTEN UP ...the NURSING POPULATIONS IS AGING>>>>>> WHAT YOU PUT OUT THERE YOU GET BACK... it is a universal law. And guess what.. it works as well for the positive as it does the negative. FIRMLY, FAIRLY AND CONSISTENTLY put love, appreciation and kindness, even with striving for excellence, and you will have a formidable nursing staff that will give you their best.
    WAKE UP. THIS WILL NOT CHANGE UNLESS WE CHANGE OUR THINKING AND OUR LIVES TO INCLUDE TREATING OURSELVES AND OTHERS AS SOMEONE WE TRULY LOVED. Do we discipline our children, having expectations for them, yes, but if not balanced with love it becomes abuse. Nursing has been suffering cyclical abuse for from long before I got here... and we put up with it. Apparently not so much anymore. Nurses have been finding other less stressful, more appreciated professions, they have been moving out voluntarily as well as being edged out with mistreatment, (See "Nurse Pays For Her Good Deed" ) GOOD FOR US, but not for the nursing shortage. Those in Nursing who make policy decisions seem to have turned the reins of the profession over to the business model.... and to people who expect nurses to fit into a mold for the highest productivity and yield and IT COMES AT A VERY HIGH PRICE, as we are now finding out. HOSPITALS and CARE FACILITIES DO NOT FUNCTION WITHOUT THEIR NURSES. Listen up WAKE UP.I cannot say more, except DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT, FAST!

  • R1_max50

    eduniya

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am going thru the same thing in th houston area. I have been job hunting for the past 2 mths and all the answers i get is dat i dont have any experience as a new grad . i worked as a nurse technician for 2 years and it seems as if dat experience is not enough...im so frustrated and whenever it tell pple they look at me as if im crazy..they all say u should be able to get a job just like dat.......it is so frustrating!!!!!1

  • Ceremony_132a_max50

    ablack

    over 5 years ago

    46 comments

    I have a suggestion, based on what one of my teachers said. PAY THE INSTRUCTORS MORE SO PEOPLE WANT TO TEACH!!!!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    flynn126

    over 5 years ago

    26 comments

    Like louna0217, I am a recent nursing grad and have passed the boards. I hold current licenses in two states, but can not find a job anywhere within a 30 mile radius of my WV home. I am considering expanding my search to 50-60 miles. Additionally, I am a much older new nursing grad with 20+ years of IT experience.

  • Louna_max50

    louna0217

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I don't get it. I am new grad in Boston, and every one in my class is job hunting for months. I am currently working as an aide at one the hospital in boston, and my manager told me to look for an RN job somewhere else. If they really need nurses, why are they making it so difficult for new grads to get hired. They are asking for more experience nurses. How would I get any experience if I don't start somewhere?

  • C

    cvshaw9

    over 5 years ago

    36 comments

    I do not believe that health care management has demonstrated any sincereity with regard to improving nursing working conditions, job security, and/or salary such as to encourage American nurses to remain in nursing and Americans to enter into the profession of nursing. Rather, nursing management has utelized every effort to maintain the same unfavorable working conditions, job insecurity, and low salaries through deceit, importing large numbersof foreign nurses, and political action committees which have been successful in maintaining political power those politicians which are inimical to the heatlh care professions.
    The fact is that the health care professions, inclusive of nursing, are based upon honor, co-operation, careing and a very strict code of conduct with regard to relationships with patients and fellow health care workers.
    At the same time, health care management is based upon the profit motive which is inimical to the concept of honor but which emphasizes a combative, deceitful, and predatory attitude.
    The two are, therefore, incompatible.
    Our nation should address this basic incomplatibily through appropriate legislation and regulation in order to address the just needs of all health care providers, inclusive of nurses, to end the nursing shortage, and most of all, to improve the quality of health care.

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