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Nursing Faculty Needed

Nursing Faculty Needed

Newsday

February 16, 2009

There is a shortage of registered nurses. Yet, tens of thousands of candidates want these secure and well-paying jobs. The prescription to alleviate this national problem is simple: Encourage more experienced nurses to become teachers, so there will be a new generation of nurses ready to take care of an aging population with a long life expectancy.

The economic downturn is causing a flood of applications to college nursing programs. By last month’s deadline, Stony Brook University had 800 applicants for the 120 seats available in the fall 2009 semester. It’s one of the few professions with clear and strong job growth that pays well – starting salaries are at least $50,000. But schools such as Suffolk Community College, which runs the largest nurse-training program in the state, are constrained from graduating more nurses because older faculty are retiring and there aren’t enough new professors to hire, since most experienced nurses don’t have the advanced teaching degrees required.

Last summer, Congress passed and President George W. Bush signed a massive higher education bill that tries to get at the root causes of the shortage, including a pilot program advocated by Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola), who is a nurse. Among its provisions is one that would give scholarships to nurses pursuing advanced teaching degrees, on the condition that they agree to join the faculty of an accredited school.

Congress, however, needs to get busy and provide funding for all these programs. Our workforce of registered nurses is nearing retirement age, along with a good chunk of the population that will need more health care services. The vital signs of the nursing profession need attention.

© YellowBrix 2009


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    tiggs1

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Yes it is about funding for tuition to become a MSN. It is also about paying Nursing instructors comparable to their education. As an RN with 30 years experience in critical care, who started as an LPN then an ADN, then a BSN and next month a MSN educator, I am finding it difficult to find a position as an instructor that doesn't require a 33% reduction in pay. I have ben an adjunct instructor for many years teachiing clinical in the ICU area, pharmacology, and med. surg. and loved it, however I am not prepared to take a $25,000 cut in pay for the privilage of following my passion.

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    JFMAHERNP

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Who in their right mind wants to take a 50% pay cut to teach, do endless paperwork, and run around chasing students doing clinical visits. I've been an RN since 1985 and have had my MSN certified as an ANP and GNP since 1988. Owned my own practice, taught as a clinical associate instructor, published articales and book chapters, had articles written about my practice and always precepted. I started as an ER tech in 1977 and spent over 30 yrs working in health care. I make less now than a decade ago, because we're crankng out NP's willing to work for less and have advanced computer abilties (did'nt even have a computer in the 70's. Got a IBM 286 for my daughter born in 1981). Employers don't care if you have 2 or 22 yrs of experience, as long as you're capable enough and cut costs to the bottom line. My recent Supervisor has less than 1/3 of my experience and I taught one of the other supervisors, when they were in there NP program. I'd be happy to teach if I received a decent salary, could receive a free DNP, and know it would lead to finacial security and retirement in time to enjoy life. What do you guys think???

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    karma

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    The real problem is at the ACCN level, in their restrictive policies regarding faculty requirements. Then they promote the DNP without any emphasis of the P (practitioner) part. In other words, one can obtain the DNP and have no clinical skills requirement, except in nurse anesthesia. Of course, the nurse anesthetists are smart and have their own educational and practice standards.
    There is more than meets the eye.

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    charperrn

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I'm a masters level nurse who would like a full time teaching job. I am now an adjunct while working full time as a school nurse. I want to get out of school nursing and become a full time faculty.

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    Barbrn1002

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    I'm a registered nurse with 16 year experience, a BSN and CCRN to boot! I'm still paying off my BSN education, so WHO is going to help me pay for my Master's degree so I can teach???? Our hospital is also making non-clinical staff take a day off a pay...this has filtered down to the clinical staff (aides, secretaries and LPN's mostly. So we are also working with a skeleton crew, but still the same high acuity found in an ICU! It isn't RIGHT!

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    JDQ13

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    This is very true, at Western Nevada College last year over 300 people applied to the nursing program but they can only accept 60.

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    marvan8kbs

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    I have over 15 years of hospital experience, and my BSN...I am frequently told that i should be a nurse educator, upon finally trying to get in to pursue the advanced degrees required, i found that they have hundreds of applicants for only a few seats.....i had great references from docs and supervisors but still did not get one of the coveted spots.....

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    h3ll0kittie

    over 5 years ago

    18 comments

    wow i applied to stony brook university for the fall '09 semester

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    Maledon

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    I'm from the midwest and I would like to know what RN in this area STARTS at $50,000. In this area you have to work as a Director of Nursing before you get that kind of pay. Been a nurse for 13 years in this area and had excellent job reviews and still got close to minimal pay increases. In fact a major Hospital in this area has laid off approximately 60 plus employees in the last two months, ancillary staff and some healthcare staff! It is unfortunate that decisions made about pay and staffing seem to be generated by individuals who have never actually worked the floor or who have not worked the floor in the last decade. Is it time to create a union SPECIFIC for nurses? The bottom line is the quality of care for those that need us. Cares will continue to decline until the powers -that-be realize that education and incentives to stay in nursing will help alleviate the shortage that is only going to get worse. I'm concerned that a "quick fix" will be created and possibly lower graduating standards to "speed up" the graduating process to open up limited availability in accredited nursing schools rather than incentives to produce more instructors. God love the new graduates, but am the only one that notices that new grads are trained more in books than in clinicals? Am I the only one that feels licenses are in jeopardy on a daily basis due to understaffing, call-offs, and that medical and behavior acuity is increasing on residents/patients? Love being a nurse but in this area it seems that the "purse" is replacing "Nurse" in nursing.

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    Account Removed

    almost 6 years ago

    I am so tired of the bogus articles about the nursing shortage. CEO's and hospital administrators make us work with skeleton crews so they can increase revenue 10 fold, there is no shortage, they cut staff and tell the newspapers there is a shortage, it is only a ploy so they can get more sympathy, funding and donations. Our pay is too low to raise a family, it is too expensive to get an advanced degree, and the benefits are poor or nil when nurses are exposed to everything! You'd think the government would take better care of us, make it easier and cheaper to get an advanced degree, afterall 22 years of experience should be a wealth of knowledge no matter what, healthcare for all nurses whether they are part time, registry, etc. I think an advanced degree should be much cheaper, easier to obtain, afterall I refuse to be paying a student loan while I'm living in a nursing home because that is what would happen if I wanted to further my degree now and be saddled with outrageous student loans, university bills, etc. This career needs some revamping and these new smart young nurses need to step up to the plate and help out with lobbying and fixing this system!!

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    cldavis

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    dolphinrn1, I do not know where you are located in the Chicagoland area. check out Methodist College of Nursing in Peoria or Chamberlain College of Nursing in Addison; see if either would assist you. It's worth the phone calls. ADVANCE for Nurses is having a job fair on Thursday, 3/19, in Tinley Park at the Holiday Inn Select if interested in FREE CE or visiting with exhibitors. Best of luck to you.

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    pattivt

    almost 6 years ago

    6 comments

    NEWSFLASH! California Community Colleges have PLENTY of instructors, but district and state policies make it impossible to get more than a few hours per week unless you are able to qualify for one of the very few fulltime positions available. This is probably the biggest fraud you can imagine that is being perpetrated on the public. We don't need MORE instructors as much as we need to start using the ones we currently have (as well as pay them a decent salary). At the college where I work we have 8 full time and over 50 Associate Instructors and the majority of us have to work 2 and 3 jobs just to make it. Another local college has over 100 Associate faculty!! Anyone besides me think there is something desparately wrong with this picture??

    Trust me, those of us who are associate faculty are there because we have a passion for teaching and most of us would give our right arms to work more!! Until nursing is treated differently than biology, sociology or English, all departments which all rely heavily upon associate faculty, the deception of the nursing educator shortage will continue to be perpetrated here in California! What college department besides nursing requires full time attendance and 8-12 hr clinical shifts? Yet, we are treated with exactly the same rules and regulations which make no sense for a profession as important as nursing.

    I and many other instructors have worked semesters where we were actually told we had to STOP working before the class or clinical rotation was completed because we had met our alloted "load" of hours!! And then what happens? They simply bring in another associate faculty member to fill the hours even if it puts them over their "load" because it’s under a different pay category. I constantly look for opportunities to fill in for other instructors who met their quota and this just shouldn't be. This policy is disruptive to the continuity of instruction and it leaves the students confused as instructors are "shifted" around. Nursing HAS to be seen and treated differently from other departments in the community colleges if we are to be effective and turn out greater numbers of nurses. If all they did was use the staff they had we could easily increase the number of students brought into the program significantly, but as things stand we are hamstrung by old and outdated policies designed to save money by not having to pay benefits. As a footnote, I even volunteered to forego benefits in order to teach more, but the system as it makes no provision for this option.

    Here’s another tidbit that occurred this year. While all the other associate faculty in the community colleges received a 7% increase in hours by the state legislature associate faculty in the nursing department received no increase in our hours. Again, if nursing is so important to the community, what is wrong with this picture??

    The public needs to know the truth "Behind the Scenes" of the nursing shortage in California so changes can be made at a fundamental level. This is the only way we can fulfill our call to serve the students and profession we love!

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    myloca2000

    almost 6 years ago

    6 comments

    There nurses who are educators available abroad. Many have Masters degree who will be willing to work in the US if properly oriented in the system

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    swimnutt1523

    almost 6 years ago

    748 comments

    fortunately even in this bad ecomonomy we are still needed. But unfortunately nursing school is a arm and a legg expense wise We truely do need more funding

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    seb

    almost 6 years ago

    14 comments

    If anybody is counting, AZ also requires MSN to teach at the ADN level. I thought I would teach eventually but the time and $ required to obtain an MSN excludes me from that idea.

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