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Nursing Faculty Needed

Nursing Faculty Needed

Newsday

February 16, 2009

There is a shortage of registered nurses. Yet, tens of thousands of candidates want these secure and well-paying jobs. The prescription to alleviate this national problem is simple: Encourage more experienced nurses to become teachers, so there will be a new generation of nurses ready to take care of an aging population with a long life expectancy.

The economic downturn is causing a flood of applications to college nursing programs. By last month’s deadline, Stony Brook University had 800 applicants for the 120 seats available in the fall 2009 semester. It’s one of the few professions with clear and strong job growth that pays well – starting salaries are at least $50,000. But schools such as Suffolk Community College, which runs the largest nurse-training program in the state, are constrained from graduating more nurses because older faculty are retiring and there aren’t enough new professors to hire, since most experienced nurses don’t have the advanced teaching degrees required.

Last summer, Congress passed and President George W. Bush signed a massive higher education bill that tries to get at the root causes of the shortage, including a pilot program advocated by Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola), who is a nurse. Among its provisions is one that would give scholarships to nurses pursuing advanced teaching degrees, on the condition that they agree to join the faculty of an accredited school.

Congress, however, needs to get busy and provide funding for all these programs. Our workforce of registered nurses is nearing retirement age, along with a good chunk of the population that will need more health care services. The vital signs of the nursing profession need attention.

© YellowBrix 2009


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    ldelvalle

    over 5 years ago

    14 comments

    I recently graduated with my BSN and actually had trouble finding a job. All the hospitals required an internship to work as a new nurse. This is despite the number of regular nursing positions available. My classmates and I found that these internships are very competitive to get into, even after already having passed the boards. There need to be more GN internships available for recent graduates or they will never have enough nurses.

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    swetluv10169

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I feel your fustration, except I don't have that experience. But I am on a 2 YEAR waiting least trying to get it!!! Its is a bit ridiculous......you would think by now something would be done about this..... I went to school for two years in order to finish prerequisites to get on the 2 year waiting list for the RN program. I really hate to wait....but know that I don't have a choice!!! I already have a job....just waiting on the education!

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    slamond

    over 5 years ago

    34 comments

    If they need faculty so badly, why does my state ( RI, and many others) insist that I have an MSN ot Doctorate to teach in an AD, Diploma or PN Program?
    I'm an RN/BSN, Board-certified for twenty-years, in Community/Public Health Nursing. I have over 35+ years of administrative, educational, supervisory and clinical expertise. I have formally taught MA students Pharmacology for 3 1/2 years. However, now I'm out of work, and I can't find any nursing program that will allow BSNs to even teach Fundamentals in a classroom. Because of my age, I'm having difficulty finding any scholarship money to go back to school. Does anyone realize that an online RN MSN program costs $40,000???? Can anyone else comment on this?
    I'm totally frustrated!

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    dolphinrn1

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    What schools of nursing in the greater Chicagoland area will assist with a nurse getting the advanced degree to be able to teach in return for working for that school after??

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    youdonthearme

    over 5 years ago

    8 comments

    How does one go about getting a staff position even with a ASN, BSN, MSN (candidate) background? I have been trying for what seems forever and yet, none of the community colleges and/or traditional schools in my local area appear to be interested in my areas of expertise, psychiatric nursing and correctional healthcare. While we all are acutely aware of the need for more nurses to help with the burgeoning healthcare system, it seems as if the system itself is not receptive to new members joining its ranks. So, does anyone have any suggestions? I'm listening....

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    rndrew01

    over 5 years ago

    132 comments

    If you want to teach VN/PN an MSN is not required..:)

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    Niqurn87

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I have been an RN for 20+ years. First a diploma grad, than back to school for my BSN, and now plan to graduate in May with an MSN. I currently practice 24 hours per week in an acute-care clinical setting (NICU), and teach part-time clinical nursing education for a community college. The hours equal approximately that of a full-time job. My salary combined is satisfying.

    There are many issues to this dilemma, the good news is, it is being recognized and addressed. The government has allocated money for scholarships and grants, many employers offer tuition reimbursement, and some colleges and healthcare institutions have formed collaborative partnerships to facilitate the preparation of nurse educators. The American Nurses Association, local state nursing association affiliates, and specialty nursing associations have sholarship money available as well. I applied for and recieved approxiamately $6,000 in scholarships and had another 50% of my tuition costs reimbursed by my employer. There is money out there, it does take some effort to recieve it.

    I empathize with those who feel frustrated about the requirements for higher education degrees required to teach. I also shared your perceptions before I entered into an MSN program. However, I can say that this experience has been awesome. An incredible amount of work, but truly awesome. I've learned and experienced things related to the nursing profession, healthcare, and most importantly, how we need to educate the nurses of the future. I am able to use all of my previous nursing experiences, applying them to this new knowledge. Making this journey back to school has given me the confidence to go on as a leader in nursing, to advocate for students, for the communities we serve, and for this incredible profession we belong to.

    I challenge anyone who loves to teach, please consider obtaining an MSN. It is not at all like "going back to nursing school" as you once knew. It is self-rewarding, it is good for the profession, and it is good for healthcare.

    Edie (edie61066@hotmail.com)

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    mlmilligan

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    amen, smschaflePHN. I am also a BSN with a board certification in med/surg. I am 54 and I love to teach and have the knowledge but the MSN is holding me back. MMRN-BC, BSN

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    smschaflePHN

    over 5 years ago

    38 comments

    As a BSN and baby boomer, I have a lot of experience for teaching. and I love to teach. However, getting a MSN at this age is ludicrous since I would never be able to recoup the amount of money spent on a masters degee before my career is over. Back in the day, I was taught by many RN's without a degree of any kind. They were excellent teachers with top notch skills. I learned a great deal from them. Perhaps if some postions only required a BSN with a life time of experience, there would be more nurses available for teaching positions.

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    nancynurse49

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    Hello. As a full time MSN student and a nurse educator in a Practical Nursing program for the past eight years, I find it discouraging that the students I am graduating as LPNs will be starting out at what I make as an RN with 30 years experience in the education field. Historically, edcuators are underpaid, but this is ridiculous!

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    coco420

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I am one of those experienced nurses that took an opportunit yto go back to school to become a nurse educator. I am scheduled to complete my MSN in May. I did this through the help of the FUND project that paid me 20% of my work time off to complete my degree. The goal of the project was twofold, to produce nurse educators to aid in the educator shotages in our area , and secondly to keep those educators in a dual role between the local colleges and hospitals where they currently work. This was a 2 year accelerated program and couldn't have done this any other way. Problem is I'm finished in May, not many job aspects and now I'm about 10 thousand dollars in debt! Great idea but poor long term planning!

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    slamond

    over 5 years ago

    34 comments

    Willa,
    That would be a great solution if I worked at a hosptial. I can only find per diem work doing health screening and flu clinics in season. I tried 2 teaching positions in teaching Med. Assists., and ended up working a 7-8 hr. day. That lasted 3 weeks before the pain nearly killed me. I loved working at the Jr. College for M.A.,s for 3 years, but the school is going bust in December.

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    fashionablady

    over 5 years ago

    10 comments

    I do agree that nurse educators need to be paid on level with what an active RN makes annually... but then, teachers have always been underpaid_ and where would we be without them?!

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    fashionablady

    over 5 years ago

    10 comments

    The AACN website has a listing of available scholarships, several of which are specifically aimed at assisting nurses who are willing to obtain a higher level degree in order to become nurse educators. Here's the link if anyone wants to look at it... hope it answers some questions!
    http://www. aacn.nche.edu/Education/financialaid.htm

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    Emmatol

    over 5 years ago

    186 comments

    Like what happens in nearly all countries, nurse educator are not well remunerated when compared with the new grads in nursing npractice. This further reduce the zeal to teach, I hope if nurse educators are well remunerated, things would turn around for better.

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