Print
+11

Nursing Faculty Needed

Nursing Faculty Needed

Newsday

February 16, 2009

There is a shortage of registered nurses. Yet, tens of thousands of candidates want these secure and well-paying jobs. The prescription to alleviate this national problem is simple: Encourage more experienced nurses to become teachers, so there will be a new generation of nurses ready to take care of an aging population with a long life expectancy.

The economic downturn is causing a flood of applications to college nursing programs. By last month’s deadline, Stony Brook University had 800 applicants for the 120 seats available in the fall 2009 semester. It’s one of the few professions with clear and strong job growth that pays well – starting salaries are at least $50,000. But schools such as Suffolk Community College, which runs the largest nurse-training program in the state, are constrained from graduating more nurses because older faculty are retiring and there aren’t enough new professors to hire, since most experienced nurses don’t have the advanced teaching degrees required.

Last summer, Congress passed and President George W. Bush signed a massive higher education bill that tries to get at the root causes of the shortage, including a pilot program advocated by Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola), who is a nurse. Among its provisions is one that would give scholarships to nurses pursuing advanced teaching degrees, on the condition that they agree to join the faculty of an accredited school.

Congress, however, needs to get busy and provide funding for all these programs. Our workforce of registered nurses is nearing retirement age, along with a good chunk of the population that will need more health care services. The vital signs of the nursing profession need attention.

© YellowBrix 2009


+11
  • Photo_user_blank_big

    lumiel

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    The pay for college nursing instructors is less than what the students will be making after graduating with a 2 year degree, yet a BSN or higher is required. There isn't a shortage of nursing instructors, just not enough people willing to get advanced degrees to take a pay cut.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Willa

    over 5 years ago

    14 comments

    Check with the education department at the hospital in which you work. Many hospitals pay tuition for their nursing staff who want to upgrade. The classes may be online or at a local college. You usually have to fill out a lot of paperwork, keep working, and make passing grades on each class you take to get the classes paid. So it may take you more time to get through than you hope, but you can do it.

    And, yes, it is true that colleges have to pay nurses more than they pay other faculty to be able to have them on staff. It is a shame that the teachers who teach the RN candidates anatomy and physiology, microbiology, etc. make so much less than the just graduated nurses, too. (And work so many more hours for the honor.

    If you have a passion for teaching, check at your local college for help. You may be able to teach something other than nursing.

  • Kali_5-day-22_max50

    mary820886

    over 5 years ago

    32 comments

    If we don't have enough staff nurses for hospitals, of course we aren't going to have enough nursing faculty! Unless you are a tenured Phd of nursing, it doesn't pay well. Once again nurses are not paid as well as they should be for what they have to do. If the government wants more nurses, start providing government paid tuition for nurses to go to school. College is expensive!

  • 100_3861_max50

    slamond

    over 5 years ago

    34 comments

    I'm willing to take any salary for teaching! However, in RI, all RN (diploma, AS,BSN) all require MSN degrees to teach. It is not like that in most of the states. An MSN online costs $40,000!!! I'm disabled, have Fibromyalgia, only on SSDI, and over 55. Who'll give me a scholarship??? My passion is teaching.....No one will give me the chance......

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Deewhit

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    I am a 50 year old BSN RN that has worn her back out after many years of nursing. I would love to get my MSN Ed to go on to teach at an accredited nursing program. My problem is every time I try to get funding I hit stone walls. If there is any help out there in getting the funding to do my MSN Ed please let me know.

    Thank you,

    Dorothy Whitson, BSN RN

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    mgrn

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I agree with cdnurse. I have explored becoming a nurse educator until I found out I would have to cut my pay in have to teach. I have over twenty years in nursing, and think should meet the requirement of an experienced nurse. I do not have my master's but i do have my bachelor's. I think they want nurses to stay at the bedside and not further their education. In PA now you will soon need a PhD, to become a nurse practitioner.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    pnorcross

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I desire to become a nursing school instructor. I am seeking funding to pay for tuition for my Masters in Nursing. Is there any special programs offred.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    jlsullivan46

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    The government needs to offer better scholarships and incentives for payback and better % rates on all Nursing student loans. Especially, lowering the loans % rates on the loans already in repayment. Nurses need financial support. Their salaries are never secured either. Nurses can be downstaffed at the hospital's benefit. Our country needs to address healthcare as it is not as a commodity. "Quality" healthcare is safe health care with safe, greater patient-care outcomes! Pay nurses better benefits and higher salaries!!!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    blondrn

    over 5 years ago

    4 comments

    Have you seen the paperwork just to get a student loan? I have a credit score of 752 and was turned down for a loan because my score wasn't high enough...the banks are getting very picky about who they loan money to, even to students...

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Jenny65

    over 5 years ago

    48 comments

    need to pay more money being registered nurses.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    It might help if they would pay better. Pay is awful. A new grad makes more than faculty.

NursingLink School Finder

Save time in your search for a nursing or healthcare degree program. Use NursingLink's School Finder to locate schools online and in your area.

Get Info

* In the event that we cannot find a program from one of our partner schools that matches your specific area of interest, we may show schools with similar or unrelated programs.