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Nurse Shortages Have Hospitals on Call

Nurse Shortages Have Hospitals on Call

Rash Madkour / AP

March 16, 2009

MIAMI – Newly minted nurse Katie O’Bryan was determined to stay at her first job at least a year, even if she did leave the hospital every day wanting to quit.

She lasted nine months. The stress of trying to keep her patients from getting much worse as they waited, sometimes for 12 hours, in an overwhelmed Dallas emergency room was just too much. The breaking point came after paramedics brought in a child who’d had seizures. She was told he was stable and to check him in a few minutes, but O’Bryan decided not to wait. She found he had stopped breathing and was turning blue.

“If I hadn’t gone right away, he probably would have died,” O’Bryan said. “I couldn’t do it anymore.”

Many novice nurses such as O’Bryan are thrown into hospitals with little direct supervision, quickly forced to juggle multiple patients and make critical decisions for the first time in their careers. About one in five newly licensed nurses quits within a year, according to one national study.

That turnover rate is a major contributor to the nation’s growing shortage of nurses. But there are expanding efforts to give new nursing grads better support. Many hospitals are trying to create safety nets with residency training programs.

“It really was ‘Throw them out there and let them learn,’” said University of Portland nursing professor Diane Vines. The university now helps run a yearlong program for new nurses.

“This time around, we’re a little more humane in our treatment of first-year grads, knowing they might not stay if we don’t do better,” she said.

The national nursing shortage could reach 500,000 by 2025, as many nurses retire and the demand for nurses balloons with the aging of baby boomers, according to Peter Buerhaus of Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Nursing schools have been unable to churn out graduates fast enough to keep up with the demand, which is why hospitals are trying harder to retain them.


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    lpnfire

    almost 6 years ago

    80 comments

    man i would give anything to work in the hospital... but they just dont like LPN's even with their IV certification! :(

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    lraw3

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    Even as a vetern ED RN, patients still get to me, but overall, I think we are eating our young.

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    judyblue1

    almost 6 years ago

    14 comments

    dont ever miss any time,its very hard to get a job if you miss any significant amt.of time i took care of my dad for 5years and with 30 years expirence i cant find a job r.n.1974

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    denae

    almost 6 years ago

    2 comments

    I wanted to go to nursing school and encountered a NUMBER of problems:
    1. The prerequisites-tell me that you HAVE to know advanced microbiology to be a nurse...
    2. Hospitals are not hiring newbies
    3. Hospitals used to totally train people to become nurses (okay, I;m old). No hospitals TEACH nursing anymore, although there were "fellowship" programs affiliated with local community colleges. I'm guessing this will never change (as far as hospitals teaching)
    4. It is almost impossible to hold a job when you have clinicals-they indicate that you are pretty much "on call".
    I myself, do not have a Mommy and Daddy willing to pay for my school and support me otherwise while I learn.
    Does anyone have any positive insights? Super cheap programs anywhere? I would even relocate.
    It just seems to me if this is going to be such a crisis, that SOMEONE would make making SOMETHING easier.
    Of course, we can just keep importing nurses and not educating new ones here, I guess...that has worked so well so far...

    4.

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    peanutt329

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    If there is such a nursing shortage, then why do I have such a problem getting a nursing job? I can't get anyone to call me back for a job and not to mention when you finally get a job interview, you never get the job because someone else always has better qualifications then you do. What is the point of wasting your time and money going to nursing school?

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    violyr98

    almost 6 years ago

    4 comments

    The problem with Hospitals right now there are not hiring entry level or newly grad.There requirements are with in 1 to 2 years experience.

    San Francisco California

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    Account Removed

    almost 6 years ago

    really?
    ow here in the philippines , nurses are over populated that a lot of BSN RN here are jobless oh my god like me

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    michelleansley

    almost 6 years ago

    16 comments

    new nurses entering fields really need the inside scoop and this gives insight

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    Account Removed

    almost 6 years ago

    Wow!

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    Account Removed

    almost 6 years ago

    Check out the article that I posted on nursing schools.
    http://nursinglink.monster.com/news/articles/7855-new-nursing-schools-s...

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