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Despite Layoffs, Nurses in Demand: Nurse Educators Needed

Despite Layoffs, Nurses in Demand: Nurse Educators Needed

Tim Krohn / The Free Press

April 08, 2009

The news in recent weeks has been jolting to many in a profession that most considered recession- proof. Licensed professional nurses have been laid off in significant numbers at area hospitals and clinics.

“Students do question, ‘Will there be a job for me when I graduate?’” said Cheryl Pratt, regional dean of nursing for Rasmussen College.

The answer, said Pratt and other nurse educators, is that the recession is hitting all sectors, including health care, but the long term demand for nurses is huge.

“Hospitals are businesses, too,” Pratt said. “People put off elective procedures and that hits the hospitals in the short run and they don’t need as many nurses.”

Paula Swiggum, associate professor of nursing at Gustavus Adolphus College, said the long-term demand for nurses – particularly registered nurses – isn’t going to change.

“Even now, there are places in the country that have a chronic shortage of nurses. A lot of our seniors have been applying in the south and west and easily getting jobs,” Swiggum said. “Minnesota has had some shortages, but it’s not as bad as other parts of the country.”

One thing both women said, however, is that LPNs are taking a bigger hit now and may have more limited employment options in the future.


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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    PAOR

    about 5 years ago

    4 comments

    "I have been an LPN for 10 years and I am tired of getting Pushed and I mean PUSHED around by RN's and administration. I am starting back to school in the fall to get my pre req's done. The major issue in Oregon is that when it comes time to do my nursing courses their is a wait list due to the shortage of nurse educators. While I am getting my degrees(I am going right on to MSN) I will remind them of past Aide's and LPN's that now are MSN and in charge of some of the units. Be careful who you kick down on your way up the ladder. Someone that you have kicked may be looking down on you in the future."
    This is article is a snake attack on LPN's due to RN's worried that LPN's are taking their jobs.
    We are in a recession which makes LPN's in high demand due to the fact that we can do the same job as an RN for less. Any one who is a CEO can do the math and figure this out.
    What we should all be worried about is that they are hiring medication aide's that have VISA's from other countries to do the jobs of all nurses. Many clinics do not even have nurses!

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    gtw

    over 5 years ago

    12 comments

    This article compares apples to oranges, These two types of nurses have distinct practice scopes and skill sets. If one type of license covers a greater number of duty requirements, then why wouldn’t a facility choose to retain that type of nurse over the other? An RN with ACLS can still do basic patient care. I think comparing ADN to BSN would be a more interesting.

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    Hot_Rod_Harley

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    LPN was supposed to be a (very) temporary fix to a shortage of RNs. The fact that this "temporary" solution stretched from the Korean War-era until now has only been because hospitals are too cheap to hire an all-RN staff. And to this date, LPN status still exists because of that. If all nurses had to be not only an RN but have a Bachelor's in Nursing I can guarantee you that wages for nurses would be commensurate for the work done and knowledge required to do so. And, before you spout, I am an ADN.

    And, studies have borne out that infections are less, hospital stays shorter and overall patient costs are less when using an all RN staff. LPNs - don't like that? Go back and get your RN. I know hundreds of LPNs who are super nurses and get screwed by doing the work for less money. If it is that easy to be an RN - get after it!

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    kdblueey

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    If I was a LPN, and read this article, I would be very angry. It's putting down LPN's and their skills as a nurse. Regardless of our educational backgrounds or degrees, A NURSE IS A NURSE. Period. I know some LPN's who are even better than some RN's.

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    cancerrising

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    I can't believe that Swiggum said "there are less infections ,when only RN,s are working in a hospital.I am a LPN ,I have worked ,and , been a patient in a hospital in the last six months. I had to correct both , the Rn and The LPN about my medication, and handwashing between patients.I think you should rethink that statement.Without the LPN's doing the mundane tasks, I don't belive RN's could function at thye best of their ability. Veronica Henderson,LPN

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    poseytoy

    over 5 years ago

    6 comments

    I am an LPN and I am IV certified. I totally disagree with the fact that there are less hospital acquired infection with all RN staff. LPN are the RN backbone!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Account Removed

    over 5 years ago

    Interesting

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    elvisen

    over 5 years ago

    2 comments

    it is happening all around my city.Lpns are being laid off for minor infractions such as few minutes late to work. in the past , you are told to just come in as soon as you can. Now you are expected to come in Punctually. If you cant make it on time you are told not bother coming in at all. it is a sign of the time. my feeling is that Rn is the way to go if you want some respectibility and job security.

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