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Inmates Assist Ill and Dying Fellow Prisoners in Hospices

Inmates Assist Ill and Dying Fellow Prisoners in Hospices

USA Today

November 30, 2009

ANGOLA, La. — Ted “Animal” Durbin expected prison life to be about brawls and knife fights — not changing adult diapers or bathing grown men.

Four times a week, Durbin, 51, who’s serving 140 years for armed robbery at Louisiana State Penitentiary, meets with frail, dying inmates at the prison’s Treatment Center. He bathes them, provides other personal care and often squeezes skeletal hands as their bodies succumb to shriveled livers or stomach cancer. It’s the best job he has ever had, he said.

“I can’t repay society for some of the things that I did,” Durbin said during a recent shift at the prison’s hospice program. “But I can do it right here where I’m at.”

The program at the penitentiary, better known as Angola state prison, is one of a growing number of hospice programs for dying inmates, said Carol McAdoo, a coordinating consultant with the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. More than 75 state and federal prisons in 40 states, from California to Iowa to Texas, have hospice programs, she said.

Volunteer inmates shave debilitated prisoners, give them bed baths, help them to the bathroom or clean their rooms. Many of the volunteers are lifers themselves who hope the favor is repaid when they are unable to walk 10 paces to the bathroom.

“I know one day I’m going to be there,” said Scott Meyers, 35, a volunteer at Angola who’s serving 149 consecutive years for armed robbery and second-degree murder. “All I can do is hope there’s going to be someone like me to be there for me.”

The hospice programs underscore the challenges prison officials face in taking care of a rapidly graying prison population. The number of state and federal prisoners age 50 or older has soared from 41,586 in 1992 to more than 167,000 in 2005, McAdoo said. About 3,300 inmates die in prisons each year, she said.

“Tougher sentencing laws have created a huge growth in the number of aging inmates and people who aren’t going to get out before they die,” McAdoo said.

Before the programs, inmates died alone in prison medical wards and often suffered through painful ailments, said Fleet Maull, a former inmate who helped start the nation’s first hospice program at the Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Springfield, Mo. The programs also save money by reducing hospital visits, he said.

“When we started, people were being given aspirin for bone cancer,” said Maull, who served 14 years on drug trafficking charges. “Today, people can have a self-administered morphine drip. We’ve figured out how to do these things in a safe and a compassionate way.”


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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Partizannka

    about 4 years ago

    2 comments

    Nursing is one of the bravest jobs on Earth!
    shower enclosures

  • Pink_rose2_2__max50

    patyg

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    Is there a list of prison facilities in PA,Pittsburgh area and to they hire RNs for pain management?

  • 030_max50

    JudeElf

    over 4 years ago

    14 comments

    As a certified Hospice & Palliative Hospice Nurse it is extremely gratifying to see that these inmates are learning Compassion and giving to their fellow inmates what can only be described as God's work here on Earth. i hope it is passed onto them that I have the utmost respect for them, and thank them for carrying on our work at one of the country's most notorious prisons. They are redeeming themselves in God's eyes, and I will share this article with my fellow Hospice Nurse's.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    cjshellmsn

    over 4 years ago

    2 comments

    Truly amazing article. I am impressed. :)

  • Katbwcolor_max50

    dreaminofthetropics

    over 4 years ago

    6 comments

    I agree I think that this is a great program and should be spread around the country to other institutions. The overall concept of hospice is a great thing.

  • Deployed_dec_02_-_mar_03_083_max50

    USAFlightMedic

    over 4 years ago

    86 comments

    Certainly a positive outcome in an otherwise negative environment. I would like this to expand to other similar institutions.

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    Account Removed

    over 4 years ago

    As a nurse working in a Texas prison I know many of these men ended up here by making poor choices. Many are not mean but were desperate or under the influence or have a diminished mental capacity and a million other reasons for offending. A great many show concern for others including being highly offended when anyone hurts a child or a helpless individual. Hopefully the program described here can be emulated in other institutions. Thank you for posting this.

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