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    HIV Blood From '90s Infected 74 in China

    HIV Blood From '90s Infected 74 in China
    HIV-contaminated blood sold to a Chinese hospital in the 1990s and used in transfusions has infected 74 people, a health official said. The director of a health center in central China discovered in 2003 a patient with HIV had sold his blood to the hospital, China's state-run Xinhua news agency reported Friday. The hospital traced all blood sellers and receivers before ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rate This
  • +1

    New Test Aims to Predict Breast Cancer Risk Better

    New Test Aims to Predict Breast Cancer Risk Better
    SAN ANTONIO – A new test to predict an ordinary woman's odds of getting breast cancer works better than a method doctors have relied on for decades, researchers reported Friday. The test is the first to combine dozens of genes and personal factors like age and childbearing to gauge risk in women who don't have a strong family history of the ...
    Published almost 9 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Researcher Seeks Common Language for Pain

    Researcher Seeks Common Language for Pain
    When if comes to pain, doctors and patients may not be speaking the same language, and a U.S. researcher says he wants to change that. David Cella of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago says he is on mission to revolutionize the language of pain, as well as fatigue, depression and anxiety. These symptoms are used by researchers to ...
    Published about 8 years ago | Rated: +3
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    The Price of Miracles

    The Price of Miracles
    For one long winter, Yvonne Freeman, then a pregnant mother of three, lived on the streets of Olneyville, with her children, ages 3, 6, and 9. Day by day, she worried about how to feed them, how to keep them warm. But she didn’t worry about the one growing inside her. That one, she figured, was safe. Her obstetrician chided her ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rated: +7
  • +5

    Washington State to Allow 'Dignity' Deaths

    Washington State to Allow 'Dignity' Deaths
    OLYMPIA, Wash. — Terminally ill patients with less than six months to live will soon be able to ask their doctors to prescribe them lethal medication in Washington state. But even though the "Death with Dignity" law takes effect Thursday, people who might seek the life-ending prescriptions could find their doctors conflicted or not willing to write them. Many doctors are ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rated: +5
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    Sperm Donor Passed On Sudden Death Heart Defect

    Sperm Donor Passed On Sudden Death Heart Defect
    CHICAGO - A sperm donor passed on a potentially deadly genetic heart condition to nine of his 24 children, including one who died at age 2 from heart failure, according to a medical journal report. Two children, both now teenagers, have developed symptoms and are at risk for sudden cardiac death, the report says. It's the second documented instance of a ...
    Published about 8 years ago | Rate This
  • +1

    Salmonella Outbreak Spreads to 42 States

    Salmonella Outbreak Spreads to 42 States
    ATLANTA – Health officials are investigating a salmonella outbreak that reportedly has sickened nearly 400 people in 42 states, but they do not yet know exactly how the bacteria has been spreading. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not named all the states, but Ohio health officials have reported at least 50 people in 18 counties have been ...
    Published almost 9 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Atkins Diet May Shrink Brain and Boost Alzheimer's Risk

    Atkins Diet May Shrink Brain and Boost Alzheimer's Risk
    High-protein diets may shrink the brain as well as the waistline, raising the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. In tests, the brains of mice fed Atkins-like diets, rich in protein and low in carbohydrate, were five per cent lighter than those of other creatures. Importantly, areas key to memory were underdeveloped. Although it is unclear if high protein ...
    Published about 8 years ago | Rated: +1
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    US Swine Flu Cases May Have Hit 1 Million

    US Swine Flu Cases May Have Hit 1 Million
    ATLANTA — Swine flu has infected as many as 1 million Americans, U.S. health officials said Thursday, adding that 6 percent or more of some urban populations are infected. The estimate voiced by a government flu scientist Thursday was no surprise to the experts who have been closely watching the virus. "We knew diagnosed cases were just the tip of the ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rate This
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    New Study: Smoking and Second Hand Smoke Cause Brain Damage

    New Study: Smoking and Second Hand Smoke Cause Brain Damage
    Move over alcohol, brain damage has a new buddy New research is set to be published in the July issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry that looks to offer yet another damning medical argument against smoking and allowing second hand smoke in public locations. The new report finds that Tobacco smoke contains a compound which can cause brain damage. The new ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rate This
  • +1

    Babies in Magazines May Be at SIDS Risk

    Babies in Magazines May Be at SIDS Risk
    What doctors recommend to prevent sudden infant death syndrome is not always depicted in women's magazines, U.S. researchers found. SIDS researchers Dr. Rachel Moon, a pediatrician, and Brandi Joyner at Children's National Medical Center in Washington analyzed pictures of sleeping infants in 24 magazines with wide circulation among 20- to 40-year-old women. The researchers evaluated pictures -- including articles and advertisements ...
    Published about 8 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Too Sick to Work? Need Health Care? Take a Number

    Too Sick to Work? Need Health Care? Take a Number
    WASHINGTON – Master toolmaker John McClain built machine parts with details so small they couldn't be seen with the naked eye. Then a lump on his neck turned out to be cancer. Shalonda Frederick managed a bakery, and decorated cakes for special occasions. One day her face and hands, and her arms and legs, started clenching up. Then she fell off ...
    Published almost 9 years ago | Rated: -1
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    Job Profile: Registered Nurse

    Job Profile: Registered Nurse
    Adapted from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition Significant Points Nature of the Work Working Conditions Employment Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement Job Outlook Earnings Related Occupations Significant Points • Registered nurses constitute the largest health care occupation, with 2.4 million jobs. • About three out of five jobs are in hospitals. • The three major educational ...
    Published over 5 years ago | Rated: +8
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    First US Count Finds 1 in 200 Kids Are Vegetarian

    First US Count Finds 1 in 200 Kids Are Vegetarian
    Sam Silverman is co-captain of his high school football team — a safety accustomed to bruising collisions. But that's nothing compared with the abuse he gets for being a vegetarian. "I get a lot of flak for it in the locker room," said the 16-year-old junior at Westborough High School in Massachusetts. "All the time, my friends try to get me ...
    Published almost 9 years ago | Rated: +4
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    A Taste of Help to Keep Cancer Patients' Pounds Up

    A Taste of Help to Keep Cancer Patients' Pounds Up
    WASHINGTON - The statistic is shocking: Severe malnutrition and weight loss play a role in at least one in five cancer deaths. Yet nutrition too often is an afterthought until someone's already in trouble. A move is on to change that, from hospitals that hire fancy gourmet chefs to the American Cancer Society's dietitians-on-call phone service. With cancer, you've got to ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rate This
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    H1N1 Cases Near 10,000 Worldwide

    H1N1 Cases Near 10,000 Worldwide
    Forty countries have officially reported 9,830 cases of H1N1 flu, including 79 deaths, the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, said Tuesday. The H1N1 flu, formerly known as swine flu, presented mainly mild cases outside the outbreak in Mexico, said Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO director general when addressing the 62nd World Health Assembly in Geneva last week. Mexican health officials blamed ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rate This
  • +3

    When Unhealthy Foods Hijack Overeaters' Brains

    When Unhealthy Foods Hijack Overeaters' Brains
    WASHINGTON – Food hijacked Dr. David Kessler's brain. Not apples or carrots. The scientist who once led the government's attack on addictive cigarettes can't wander through part of San Francisco without craving a local shop's chocolate-covered pretzels. Stop at one cookie? Rarely. It's not an addiction but it's similar, and he's far from alone. Kessler's research suggests millions share what he ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rated: +3
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    Mass. Town Takes Steps to Trim Fat (Really), Healthcare Costs

    Mass. Town Takes Steps to Trim Fat (Really), Healthcare Costs
    Kelle Shugrue's 7-year-old son eats fresh fruit and vegetables at his public school, rides his bike along neighborhood paths and walked to school last week as part of a community effort to get kids moving. The Shugrue family lives in Somerville, Mass., a Boston suburb hailed by health advocates for its seven-year investment in programs fighting childhood obesity and encouraging healthful ...
    Published over 8 years ago | Rate This
  • +2

    Millions of Older Americans Use Risky Drug Combos

    Millions of Older Americans Use Risky Drug Combos
    CHICAGO – At least 2 million older Americans are taking a combination of drugs or supplements that can be a risky mix — from blood thinners and cholesterol pills to aspirin and ginkgo capsules — a new study warns. Among older men, the numbers are particularly alarming — one in 10 are taking potentially harmful combinations, according to the study. The ...
    Published almost 9 years ago | Rated: +2
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    FDA Debates Tougher Cancer Warning on Tanning Beds

    FDA Debates Tougher Cancer Warning on Tanning Beds
    WASHINGTON – Just as millions head to tanning beds to prepare for spring break, the Food and Drug Administration will be debating how to toughen warnings that those sunlamps pose a cancer risk. Yes, sunburns are particularly dangerous. But there's increasing scientific consensus that there's no such thing as a safe tan, either. This is a message that Katie Donnar, 18, ...
    Published almost 8 years ago | Rate This
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