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    Swine Flu Cases Up to 7; Officials Expand Probe

    Swine Flu Cases Up to 7; Officials Expand Probe
    ATLANTA - Health officials are investigating a never-before-seen form of the flu that combines pig, bird and human viruses and which has infected seven people in California and Texas. All the victims recovered, but the cases are a growing medical mystery because it's unclear how they caught the virus. None of the seven people were in contact with pigs, which is ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rate This
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    Hospital to Use Gene Testing to Treat Cancer

    Hospital to Use Gene Testing to Treat Cancer
    BOSTON — Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital are planning to start genetic testing on cancer patients’ tumors in an effort to more effectively focus treatment. The goal of the plan to be instituted within a year is to spare patients from the traditional treatment approach, when drugs with harmful side effects are often given without knowing whether they will work. Dr. ...
    Published about 5 years ago | Rated: +2
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    School Nurses Don't Know How They'll Isolate Sick Kids

    School Nurses Don't Know How They'll Isolate Sick Kids
    There's no place to isolate sick, feverish kids if swine flu hits hard at the city's most overcrowded schools, nurses are warning. Health rules require staffers to put masks on schoolchildren with fevers of 100 degrees or higher and place them in a separate room so the airborne H1N1 virus doesn't spread. Dozens of schools, however, are functioning at more than ...
    Published over 4 years ago | Rate This
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    Study: Calorie Count on Fast-Food Menus Gives Diners Pause

    Study: Calorie Count on Fast-Food Menus Gives Diners Pause
    WASHINGTON — People who used the calorie information available at fast-food chain restaurants in New York City bought 106 fewer calories' worth of food at lunch than those who didn't see or use the information, a study shows. Researchers at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene set out to analyze the impact of the city's menu labeling ...
    Published over 4 years ago | Rate This
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    Study: Vaccinating School Kids Best Way to Stop Flu

    Study: Vaccinating School Kids Best Way to Stop Flu
    WASHINGTON--New research says the best way to protect society's most vulnerable from the flu: Vaccinate school-age children and their parents. Kids already top the U.S. government's priority list for swine-flu shots this year because that new influenza strain targets the young. That's unusual, as flu usually is most dangerous to older adults. But Thursday's study, in the journal Science, says vaccinating ...
    Published over 4 years ago | Rate This
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    New Farmers Market Serves Health Care Workers

    New Farmers Market Serves Health Care Workers
    Doctors and nurses need their fruits and vegetables, too. A new farmers market opened last week to serve health care workers, medical students and visitors at the Washington University School of Medicine campus at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in the Central West End. The school's Wellness Council came up with the idea, knowing that health care workers and students work long hours and ...
    Published over 4 years ago | Rate This
  • +3

    Doctors Say More Ovary Transplants Possible

    LONDON – Two new techniques to preserve and transplant ovaries might give women a better chance to fight their biological clocks and have children when they are older, doctors announced Monday. In the past, scientists have performed ovarian transplants in women with cancer, since chemotherapy often causes infertility. Doctors typically take out patients' ovaries before the toxic treatment begins and then ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rated: +3
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    Little Fighter: Baby Born at 23 Weeks Survives

    Little Fighter: Baby Born at 23 Weeks Survives
    She arrived four months early, so small that she could fit in the palm of her father's hand. Six months on, Jessica Hawkins is still on the tiny side - but has beaten the odds by growing into a healthy baby girl. Yesterday her mother Sam, 35, a child-care assessor, said: 'She has amazed us and all the hospital staff who ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rated: +7
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    Largest-Ever Study of US Child Health Begins

    Largest-Ever Study of US Child Health Begins
    WASHINGTON – Scientists begin recruiting mothers-to-be in North Carolina and New York this week for the largest study of U.S. children ever performed — aiming eventually to track 100,000 around the country from conception to age 21. "We are embarking on the road to discovering the preventable causes of the major chronic diseases that plague American children today," Dr. Philip Landrigan ...
    Published over 5 years ago | Rated: +4
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    Can a Mop Fight Swine Flu? Docs Say Probably Not

    Can a Mop Fight Swine Flu? Docs Say Probably Not
    NEW YORK — In scores of schools across the United States, the mop has been the weapon of choice in the fight against swine flu. When hundreds of children fell ill with the virus at a Queens high school last month, authorities promptly closed the building and spent days disinfecting desks and tables and running the ventilation system on full blast. ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rate This
  • +2

    Sexually Spread Diseases Up, Better Testing Cited

    Sexually Spread Diseases Up, Better Testing Cited
    ATLANTA – Sexually spread diseases — for years on the decline — are on the rise, with reported chlamydia cases setting a record, government health officials said Tuesday. The increase in chlamydia, a sometimes symptomless infection that can lead to infertility in women, is likely because of better screening, experts said. In 2007, there were 1.1 million cases, the most ever ...
    Published over 5 years ago | Rated: +2
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    Report: US Fails to Fight High Blood Pressure

    Report: US Fails to Fight High Blood Pressure
    WASHINGTON - A critical new report declares high blood pressure in the U.S. to be a neglected disease - a term that usually describes mysterious tropical illnesses, not a well-known plague of rich countries. The prestigious Institute of Medicine said Monday that even though nearly one in three adults has hypertension, and it's on the rise, fighting it apparently has fallen ...
    Published about 4 years ago | Rate This
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    Wash. State has First Death Under New Suicide Law

    Wash. State has First Death Under New Suicide Law
    OLYMPIA, Wash. - A 66-year-old woman with terminal cancer has become the first person to die under Washington state's new assisted suicide law, an advocacy group said Friday. Linda Fleming, of Sequim, died Thursday night after taking drugs prescribed under the "Death with Dignity" law that took effect in March, said Compassion & Choices of Washington. The organization says Fleming was ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rate This
  • +9

    Obama vs. McCain: Whose Healthcare Plan Reigns Supreme?

    Obama vs. McCain: Whose Healthcare Plan Reigns Supreme?
    Presidential hopefuls, Barack Obama and John McCain, both want healthcare coverage for all Americans, but they have very different ways of going about securing affordable insurance for all. Obama's plan involves a heavier government hand, including subsidies and coverage of all children. McCain's plan, on the other hand, relies on individual responsibility. *Which healthcare plan do you think will win over ...
    Published over 5 years ago | Rated: +9
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    Good Deeds Help Neighbors

    Good Deeds Help Neighbors
    A need unseen is often a need unmet, but many San Diegans opened their eyes wide this holiday season. They saw opportunities to turn their generous spirits into generous acts, especially as the economy sinks. These are only a few stories of giving, only a few of the people who stepped in when they noticed a need: a La Jolla ...
    Published over 5 years ago | Rated: +2
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    Study: Faith Plays Role in End-of-Life Medical Decisions

    Study: Faith Plays Role in End-of-Life Medical Decisions
    Cancer patients who rely on their strong religious faith to cope appear more likely to undergo intensive life-prolonging care before their deaths. Researchers evaluated 345 patients and categorized them as having a high or low level of positive religious coping based on a 14-item questionnaire. Their study is published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association. Those with a ...
    Published about 5 years ago | Rated: +6
  • +3

    Marijuana Use by Seniors Goes Up as Boomers Age

    Marijuana Use by Seniors Goes Up as Boomers Age
    MIAMI - In her 88 years, Florence Siegel has learned how to relax: A glass of red wine. A crisp copy of The New York Times, if she can wrest it from her husband. Some classical music, preferably Bach. And every night like clockwork, she lifts a pipe to her lips and smokes marijuana. Long a fixture among young people, use ...
    Published about 4 years ago | Rated: +3
  • +1

    Hearts Need Less Stress

    Hearts Need Less Stress
    Batesville, Ind. - "We had a lot of people in this area die of heart disease recently. They never got that second chance," reported Barb Luff, Margaret Mary Community Hospital cardiac rehab coordinator. That got the attention of close to 40 Batesville employees during a wellness meeting March 31. About half of people who have cardiac arrest die before they can ...
    Published almost 5 years ago | Rated: +1
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