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  • +1

    Hearts Need Less Stress

    Hearts Need Less Stress
    Batesville, Ind. - "We had a lot of people in this area die of heart disease recently. They never got that second chance," reported Barb Luff, Margaret Mary Community Hospital cardiac rehab coordinator. That got the attention of close to 40 Batesville employees during a wellness meeting March 31. About half of people who have cardiac arrest die before they can ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Wash. State has First Death Under New Suicide Law

    Wash. State has First Death Under New Suicide Law
    OLYMPIA, Wash. - A 66-year-old woman with terminal cancer has become the first person to die under Washington state's new assisted suicide law, an advocacy group said Friday. Linda Fleming, of Sequim, died Thursday night after taking drugs prescribed under the "Death with Dignity" law that took effect in March, said Compassion & Choices of Washington. The organization says Fleming was ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rate This
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    Pandemic-Preparedness Money Stripped from Stimulus

    Pandemic-Preparedness Money Stripped from Stimulus
    WASHINGTON — Congress stripped nearly $900 million to combat an influenza pandemic from the economic-stimulus package earlier this year as part of last-minute negotiations to gain GOP support for the plan. Now, with the spread of a potentially deadly strain of the swine flu, public-health advocates and liberal bloggers are sharply criticizing the move. Key Democratic lawmakers, including Iowa Sen. Tom ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Too Sick to Work? Need Health Care? Take a Number

    Too Sick to Work? Need Health Care? Take a Number
    WASHINGTON – Master toolmaker John McClain built machine parts with details so small they couldn't be seen with the naked eye. Then a lump on his neck turned out to be cancer. Shalonda Frederick managed a bakery, and decorated cakes for special occasions. One day her face and hands, and her arms and legs, started clenching up. Then she fell off ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rated: -1
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    Researchers Find More American Women May Be Obese Than Thought

    Researchers Find More American Women May Be Obese Than Thought
    One-half of white women and more than two-thirds of Hispanic women in the United States may be obese by an international standard, researchers said. Lead author Dr. Mahbubur Rahman of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston said current U.S. National Institutes of Health body mass index values may not account for ethnic differences, and almost half of the reproductive-age ...
    Published over 6 years ago | Rate This
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    Babies in Magazines May Be at SIDS Risk

    Babies in Magazines May Be at SIDS Risk
    What doctors recommend to prevent sudden infant death syndrome is not always depicted in women's magazines, U.S. researchers found. SIDS researchers Dr. Rachel Moon, a pediatrician, and Brandi Joyner at Children's National Medical Center in Washington analyzed pictures of sleeping infants in 24 magazines with wide circulation among 20- to 40-year-old women. The researchers evaluated pictures -- including articles and advertisements ...
    Published almost 7 years ago | Rated: +1
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    Flu Overhyped? Some Say Officials 'Cried Swine'

    Flu Overhyped? Some Say Officials 'Cried Swine'
    CHICAGO — Did government health officials "cry swine" when they sounded the alarm on what looked like a threatening new flu? The so-far mild swine flu outbreak has many people saying all the talk about a devastating global epidemic was just fear-mongering hype. But that's not how public health officials see it, calling complacency the thing that keeps them up at ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rated: +1
  • +2

    Sexually Spread Diseases Up, Better Testing Cited

    Sexually Spread Diseases Up, Better Testing Cited
    ATLANTA – Sexually spread diseases — for years on the decline — are on the rise, with reported chlamydia cases setting a record, government health officials said Tuesday. The increase in chlamydia, a sometimes symptomless infection that can lead to infertility in women, is likely because of better screening, experts said. In 2007, there were 1.1 million cases, the most ever ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rated: +2
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    Mass. Town Takes Steps to Trim Fat (Really), Healthcare Costs

    Mass. Town Takes Steps to Trim Fat (Really), Healthcare Costs
    Kelle Shugrue's 7-year-old son eats fresh fruit and vegetables at his public school, rides his bike along neighborhood paths and walked to school last week as part of a community effort to get kids moving. The Shugrue family lives in Somerville, Mass., a Boston suburb hailed by health advocates for its seven-year investment in programs fighting childhood obesity and encouraging healthful ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rate This
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    Consumers Pay $34 Billion for Alternative Medicine

    Consumers Pay $34 Billion for Alternative Medicine
    ATLANTA — Americans spend more than a 10th of their out-of-pocket health care dollars on alternative medicine, according to the first national estimate of such spending in more than a decade. Chiropractors, massage therapists, acupuncturists and herbal remedies are commanding significant consumer dollars as people seek high-touch care in a high-tech society, the report released Thursday by the government shows. Altogether, ...
    Published almost 7 years ago | Rate This
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    Farrah Fawcett Treated for Cancer's Spread to Liver

    Farrah Fawcett Treated for Cancer's Spread to Liver
    NEW YORK – Farrah Fawcett is being treated for anal cancer that has spread to her liver and has been hospitalized for a complication from a routine treatment, a producer who worked with the actress and her doctor said Monday. In separate phone interviews with The Associated Press, Fawcett's producer and her doctor said that Fawcett is in a Los Angeles ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rate This
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    US Cancer Death Rate Drops Again in 2006

    US Cancer Death Rate Drops Again in 2006
    ATLANTA – The U.S. cancer death rate fell again in 2006, a new analysis shows, continuing a slow downward trend that experts attribute to declines in smoking, earlier detection and better treatment. About 560,000 people died of cancer that year, according to an American Cancer Society report released Wednesday. The new numbers show the death rate fell by less than 2 ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rate This
  • +2

    Millions of Older Americans Use Risky Drug Combos

    Millions of Older Americans Use Risky Drug Combos
    CHICAGO – At least 2 million older Americans are taking a combination of drugs or supplements that can be a risky mix — from blood thinners and cholesterol pills to aspirin and ginkgo capsules — a new study warns. Among older men, the numbers are particularly alarming — one in 10 are taking potentially harmful combinations, according to the study. The ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rated: +2
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    Nurse Expert: Forget 'No Pain, No Gain'

    A U.S. expert in emergency nursing advises those coaching young athletes that "no pain, no gain" is a myth. Mary Kamienski of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey says sports should not be painful. Youngsters engaging in sports activities should be taught they reduce the risk of injury by warming up before playing and cooling down when the ...
    Published almost 8 years ago | Rate This
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    Study Finds Hospitals Speeding Heart Attack Care

    Study Finds Hospitals Speeding Heart Attack Care
    WASHINGTON - Hospitals are giving faster care to lots more heart attack patients, a speed-up sure to be saving lives. More than three-quarters of people suffering major heart attacks are getting their blocked arteries reopened within 90 minutes of arriving in the emergency room, says a Yale University study of 831 hospitals that participated in a major campaign to accelerate that ...
    Published over 6 years ago | Rate This
  • +2

    Should Medical Records Go Electronic?

    hospitals could save billions of dollars, which could in turn be spent on better care. Do you think they should be electronic?
    Published over 6 years ago | Rated: +2
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    Report: Healthcare Costs to Rise 9% in 2010

    Report: Healthcare Costs to Rise 9% in 2010
    INDIANAPOLIS - Employers who offer health insurance coverage could see a 9 percent cost increase next year, and their workers may face an even bigger hit, according to a report from consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers. Costs will rise in part because workers worried about losing their jobs are using their health care more while they still have it, the firm said in ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rate This
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    Can a Mop Fight Swine Flu? Docs Say Probably Not

    Can a Mop Fight Swine Flu? Docs Say Probably Not
    NEW YORK — In scores of schools across the United States, the mop has been the weapon of choice in the fight against swine flu. When hundreds of children fell ill with the virus at a Queens high school last month, authorities promptly closed the building and spent days disinfecting desks and tables and running the ventilation system on full blast. ...
    Published about 7 years ago | Rate This
  • +4

    Largest-Ever Study of US Child Health Begins

    Largest-Ever Study of US Child Health Begins
    WASHINGTON – Scientists begin recruiting mothers-to-be in North Carolina and New York this week for the largest study of U.S. children ever performed — aiming eventually to track 100,000 around the country from conception to age 21. "We are embarking on the road to discovering the preventable causes of the major chronic diseases that plague American children today," Dr. Philip Landrigan ...
    Published over 7 years ago | Rated: +4
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    Report: US Fails to Fight High Blood Pressure

    Report: US Fails to Fight High Blood Pressure
    WASHINGTON - A critical new report declares high blood pressure in the U.S. to be a neglected disease - a term that usually describes mysterious tropical illnesses, not a well-known plague of rich countries. The prestigious Institute of Medicine said Monday that even though nearly one in three adults has hypertension, and it's on the rise, fighting it apparently has fallen ...
    Published over 6 years ago | Rate This
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