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    Lymphatic System

    Lymphatic System
    The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up mainly of lymph vessels, lymph nodes and lymph. Lymph vessels, which are different from blood vessels, carry fluid called lymph throughout your body. Lymph contains white blood cells that defend you against germs. Throughout the vessels are lymph nodes. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where ...
    Rated: +1
  • +3

    Autonomic Nervous System

    The autonomic nervous system is a visceral efferent system, which means it sends motor impulses to the visceral organs. It functions automatically and continuously, without conscious effort, to innervate smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and glands. It is concerned with heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and other visceral activities that work together to maintain homeostasis. The autonomic nervous system ...
    Rated: +3
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    Endocrine System

    The endocrine system, along with the nervous system, functions in the regulation of body activities. The nervous system acts through electrical impulses and neurotransmitters to cause muscle contraction and glandular secretion. The effect is of short duration, measured in seconds, and localized. The endocrine system acts through chemical messengers called hormones that influence growth, development, and metabolic activities. The action of ...
    Rated: +4
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    The Cardiovascular System

    The Cardiovascular System
    h4. THE HEART h4. The Structure of the Heart The size and position of the heart - Despite its heavy workload, the heart is not a large organ. It is about the size of the person's clenched fist and weighs 10 to 12 ounces. It is hollow and roughly conical in shape, with the narrow end pointed downward, to the left, ...
    Rated: +3
  • +6

    What is a Cell?

    What is a Cell?
    Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. Some organisms, such as bacteria, are unicellular, consisting of a single cell. Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular, or have many cells - an estimated 100,000,000,000,000 cells! Each cell is an amazing world unto itself: it can take in nutrients, convert these nutrients into energy, carry out specialized functions, ...
    Rated: +6
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    Cell Structures

    h4. The Plasma Membrane - A Cell's Protective Coat The outer lining of a eukaryotic cell is called the plasma membrane. This membrane serves to separate and protect a cell from its surrounding environment and is made mostly from a double layer of proteins and lipids, fat-like molecules. Embedded within this membrane are a variety of other molecules that act as ...
    Rated: +2
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    Cell Organelles

    Cell Organelles
    The human body contains many different organs, such as the heart, lung, and kidney, with each organ performing a different function. Cells also have a set of "little organs", called organelles, that are adapted and/or specialized for carrying out one or more vital functions. Organelles are found only in eukaryotes and are always surrounded by a protective membrane. It is important ...
    Rated: +3
  • +6

    Mitosis and Meiosis: How do Cells Divide?

    Mitosis and Meiosis: How do Cells Divide?
    There are two types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis. Most of the time when people refer to “cell division,” they mean mitosis, the process of making new body cells. Meiosis is the type of cell division that creates egg and sperm cells. Mitosis is a fundamental process for life. During mitosis, a cell duplicates all of its contents, including its ...
    Rated: +6
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