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What is a Cell?

What is a Cell?

Eukaryotes and prokaryotes (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).

National Center for Biotechnology Information

Cells are the structural and functional units of all living organisms. Some organisms, such as bacteria, are unicellular, consisting of a single cell. Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular, or have many cells – an estimated 100,000,000,000,000 cells! Each cell is an amazing world unto itself: it can take in nutrients, convert these nutrients into energy, carry out specialized functions, and reproduce as necessary. Even more amazing is that each cell stores its own set of instructions for carrying out each of these activities.





Cell Organization


Before we can discuss the various components of a cell, it is important to know what organism the cell comes from. There are two general categories of cells: prokaryotes and eukaryotes.


Prokaryotic Organisms


It appears that life arose on earth about 4 billion years ago. The simplest of cells, and the first types of cells to evolve, were prokaryotic cells—organisms that lack a nuclear membrane, the membrane that surrounds the nucleus of a cell. Bacteria are the best known and most studied form of prokaryotic organisms, although the recent discovery of a second group of prokaryotes, called archaea, has provided evidence of a third cellular domain of life and new insights into the origin of life itself.

Prokaryotes are unicellular organisms that do not develop or differentiate into multicellular forms. Some bacteria grow in filaments, or masses of cells, but each cell in the colony is identical and capable of independent existence. The cells may be adjacent to one another because they did not separate after cell division or because they remained enclosed in a common sheath or slime secreted by the cells. Typically though, there is no continuity or communication between the cells. Prokaryotes are capable of inhabiting almost every place on the earth, from the deep ocean, to the edges of hot springs, to just about every surface of our bodies.

Prokaryotes are distinguished from eukaryotes on the basis of nuclear organization, specifically their lack of a nuclear membrane. Prokaryotes also lack any of the intracellular organelles and structures that are characteristic of eukaryotic cells. Most of the functions of organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the Golgi apparatus, are taken over by the prokaryotic plasma membrane. Prokaryotic cells have three architectural regions: appendages called flagella and pili – proteins attached to the cell surface; a cell envelope consisting of a capsule, a cell wall, and a plasma membrane; and a cytoplasmic region that contains the cell genome (DNA) and ribosomes and various sorts of inclusions.



Eukaryotic Organisms


Eukaryotes include fungi, animals, and plants as well as some unicellular organisms. Eukaryotic cells are about 10 times the size of a prokaryote and can be as much as 1000 times greater in volume. The major and extremely significant difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is that eukaryotic cells contain membrane-bound compartments in which specific metabolic activities take place. Most important among these is the presence of a nucleus, a membrane-delineated compartment that houses the eukaryotic cell’s DNA. It is this nucleus that gives the eukaryote – literally, true nucleus – its name.

Eukaryotic organisms also have other specialized structures, called organelles, which are small structures within cells that perform dedicated functions. As the name implies, you can think of organelles as small organs. There are a dozen different types of organelles commonly found in eukaryotic cells. In this primer, we will focus our attention on only a handful of organelles and will examine these organelles with an eye to their role at a molecular level in the cell.

The origin of the eukaryotic cell was a milestone in the evolution of life. Although eukaryotes use the same genetic code and metabolic processes as prokaryotes, their higher level of organizational complexity has permitted the development of truly multicellular organisms. Without eukaryotes, the world would lack mammals, birds, fish, invertebrates, mushrooms, plants, and complex single-celled organisms.


For information on Cell Structure, click here.



      

      

      
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  • M_bbd6fe7516cf30647b9eb0fd4128511f_max50

    nursejendoll

    over 5 years ago

    20 comments

    I recommend the book Anatomy and Physiology 6th Edition by Thibodeau & Patton.

    I also have some reviews on it on http://nursejendoll.com/?page_id=326

  • Xmas_tomatoes_haircut_241_max50

    notready

    almost 6 years ago

    12 comments

    simple, refreshing and informative, i really enjoyed reading this.

  • I__found_someone_who_loves_me

    pamchet

    almost 6 years ago

    12 comments

    Not a good article to me...4 billion years ago? Are people still falling for this? As written by Ken Ham ..."(The Bible) teaches that Adam and Eve were made at the BEGINING of creation, not billions of years after the beginning, as would be the case if the universe were really billions of years old.... that is from 'naturalistic assumptions' and not scientific observations...Noahs flood would produce exactly the kind of complex geological record we see worldwide today: thousands of feet of sediments clearly deposited by water and later hardened into rock and containing billions of fossils. If the year-long Flood is responsible for most of the rock layers and fossils, then those rocks and fossils cannot represent the history of the earth over millions of years, as evolutionists claim." I dont know about the rest of you, but it makes it really hard for me to trust any information (or even be interested) when it starts out with information contrary to what the Creator of the cell in the 1st place said!!!!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    latinachicana

    almost 7 years ago

    6 comments

    Very good article

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