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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 8 Neurological System

    h4. Chapter 8: Neurological System The nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system, and the autonomic nervous system. Together these three components integrate all physical, emotional, and intellectual activities. The CNS includes the brain and spinal cord. These two structures collect and interpret voluntary and involuntary sensory and motor signals. A brief overview of the ...
    Rated: +4
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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 10 Psychosocial Assessment

    Psychosocial assessments are often overlooked as a portion of the physical examination. However, a person's psychological well-being has much to do with physical health. The following guide to psychosocial assessment can be remembered by the acronym "SELF PACING". The findings from this assessment in addition to the physical findings will provide a comprehensive view of the patient's status. S - Self-Esteem: ...
    Rated: +1
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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 2 Integumentary System

    h4. Chapter 2: Integumentary System The skin is the largest organ in the body. The normal adult has over 20 square feet of skin so it is easy to understand how something can go wrong with this much area to cover. As a membranous barrier between a person's outer and inner surroundings, the skin responds to external changes and also reflects ...
    Rated: +2
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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 1 History and Physical Examination

    h4. Introduction Performing an accurate physical assessment and being able to differentiate normal from abnormal findings is one of the most important roles for today's health care practitioner. If an accurate physical assessment cannot be performed, whether for baseline data or when the patient's condition changes, then the patient is not receiving the level of competent care that should be given. ...
    Rated: +2
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    Functional Assessment - The Key to Geriatric Care in the 21st Century

    h4. Introduction The next 30 years will result in a unique change in population demographics in this country. This change is already beginning. The baby boomers are getting old. The over 65 population will increase from being the 13% of the population it is today to 20% by the year 2030. More people than ever will reach the 100-year mark. All ...
    Rated: +4
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    Vital Signs: Overview and Effect of Aging Changes

    Vital Signs: Overview and Effect of Aging Changes
    Vital signs show an individual is alive. They include heart beat, breathing rate, temperature, and blood pressure. These signs may be watched, measured, and monitored to check an individual's level of physical functioning. Normal vital signs change with age, sex, weight, exercise tolerance, and condition. Normal ranges for the average healthy adult vital signs are: Temperature: 97.8 - 99.1 degrees Fahrenheit ...
    Rated: +4
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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 9 Gastrointestinal System

    h4. Chapter 9: Gastrointestinal System The gastrointestinal (GI) system performs the functions of ingestion, digestion, and elimination. Interruptions of any of these functions can quickly affect the patient nutritionally and cause acid-base imbalances. When performing the GI assessment, it must be remembered that much of the population has preexisting problems and that these problems can be exacerbated or new conditions can ...
    Rated: +1
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    Physical Assessment- Chapter 6 Genitourinary System

    h4. Chapter 6: Genitourinary System Problems with the urinary or reproductive systems can not only affect these systems but they can trigger problems in other body systems. In addition, difficulties with these systems can affect the patient's quality of life and sense of well-being. The main function of the urinary system is to regulate fluid and electrolyte balance. The purpose of ...
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    Physical Assessment - Chapter 7 Endocrine System

    h4. Chapter 7: Endocrine System The endocrine system is composed of glands that both produce and secrete hormones. The pituitary gland secretes ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). These hormones stimulate the adrenal cortex and thyroid gland to do their jobs. The adrenal gland produces epinephrine, norepinephrine, and mineralcorticoids, glucocorticoids, and androgens. These hormones prepare people for emergency situations ...
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